Why I stopped selling Monat: For over a year, I’ve been using Monat products. They did, in fact, appear to have aided me. My hair looked better than it had in a long time. Simply put, I fell for the deception. I used to be one of those ‘boss babes.’ I sold to family and friends, defending the price, the ingredients, and the company.

And when I was going through quarantine and had to cut back on selling, my ‘network of bffs’ was nowhere to be found. They kicked me out of the group chat because I wasn’t selling anything. No one ever texted, called, or inquired about my well-being.

My upline didn’t reach out until I was on social media talking about starting my own business (as a pet groomer so I’d be a real business owner), only to suggest that I start selling again to make the money to start my business.

After losing contact with them, I finally began to make sense. I began to notice things that I had previously dismissed: I was losing more hair in the shower, and my scalp was extremely itchy.

Looking back, it’s a shame that I fell for it and convinced so many of my friends and family to buy this product. I’m relieved to report that I’m NO LONGER IN!

That being said, can anyone recommend some natural hair care products? The entire reason I was drawn to Monat was because they claimed to be ‘plant-based vegan haircare.’ So, if anyone has any good ideas that actually work, I’m all ears.

Why I stopped selling Monat

Then I went through all of Monat’s negative reviews to see if anyone else had had the same experience as me.

So, even before August, I had stopped really selling it because the way they want you to do things is completely contrary to my morals and personality, and it made me uncomfortable.

I’ve mentioned it before, but basically, I could go on a spree and talk 20 people into joining my business in one month (probably in a spammy-pushy kind of way), rank up, earn a lot of money, and then….

My friend had given me a set and raved about it, sounding like an expert herself. It is not necessary to be a licensed professional.

Why? They sell shampoo that is so acidic that it removes color from your hair and causes hair loss.

My hair was happier when I used a cheap grocery store product, so I stopped using their products for that reason.

They would have probably let it go if I hadn’t mentioned Monat, a company that poses a threat to the natural products they sell.

Why? As you can probably tell, I was furious about it. That’s right, Monat allows anyone to sell their product, whether or not they know anything about hair.

The products at the salon I go to (or used to go to) are great and popular, but they made me itchy and weren’t for me.

The packaging is low-quality; bottles do not seal well, and tubes split open. I’ve been using Monat products for about a year, and the quality of the products, particularly the skincare, is not what they claim (eye cream).

Even if she only worked 20 days, that works out to $7.50 per hour. 151. I also experienced severe itching for several days after using hair care products.

I was furious when I discovered everything. This is a powerful chemical. When you request an SDS sheet, they require you to sign a waiver agreeing not to share the information.

His girlfriend’s hair wasn’t damaged in any way, so I’m guessing she didn’t even use the product she was fucking selling to my sister. Archived. Tumbleweeds. The eye cream I bought was rancid or spoiled, and it smelled awful.

To deter spammers and network marketers who do not want to build a long-term business.

2 years ago by Posted by My ex-best friend (best friend for fucking 21 years, and his cunt girlfriend ruined our friendship) is dating a girl who sold my sister money, which ruined her hair.

I decided to try MONAT for the first time yesterday. She’s working 12-hour days selling Monat, but she’s now bragging about receiving an 1800-dollar bonus check for the month. Close.

She’s working 12-hour days selling Monat, but she’s now bragging about receiving an 1800-dollar bonus check for the month.

Why I Became a Member and Why I Left MONAT

It was my first summer as a married woman (2018). My husband and I had recently relocated to San Antonio for his summer job (which also provides the income we rely on the rest of the year), and I was feeling extremely lonely.

At the time, I was taking an online calculus class and trying to teach myself calculus for hours every day while my husband worked from 9 a.m. to 9 p.m. It was a dreadful day.

I ended up spending an unhealthy amount of time on social media as a result of being alone all day. Both scrolling and sharing are possible. But with no real purpose. It was unsatisfying. I wanted to make a difference in some way.

I enjoyed assisting others. I was passionate about so many things that I didn’t know which path to take. Did I mention I was completely alone? I went through a bit of an identity crisis. That much time alone will drive you insane. Hahaa.

It was also my first year of marriage, and I was going through a lot of growing pains. I’ve never been the type of girl who planned to marry and then rely on her husband for everything.

Actually, a guy was never in my plans. Sure, I had relationships, but when I imagined my future, all I saw was a powerful CEO – someone who had worked for themselves and was financially secure.

Someone who didn’t require a man! And now I’m in San Antonio, Texas, having followed my husband out here, feeling completely aimless and a little useless. Maybe you’re trapped? Idk.

I also felt like I had to ask permission to buy things that weren’t absolutely necessary because he was the one making all of the money. THAT WAS THE WORST THING EVER. It felt like I was asking my father for his credit card, which I despised.

I wished I could contribute financially in some way, but I couldn’t because of my schoolwork. He was perfectly fine with it, but I wasn’t.

I’d also recently decided that I wasn’t going to medical or pharmacy school because I didn’t want to either have kids during school, wait until I was 30 to have kids, or go to all of that schooling and then not use any of it because I was too busy taking care of kids.

I was also knee-deep in determining what my extremely difficult, nearly completed bio degree could do for me or what I could do with it. I worked as a CASE. hahahah.

It was probably in the middle of the summer when I saw another girl whose husband worked for the same company as mine, but in a different region, posting about this fantastic opportunity.

She emphasized the ability to work from anywhere (who wouldn’t want that? ), making money through social media (hello, I spent HOURS on that shiz), and these amazing hair products.

It sounded like you were some kind of influencer. She also mentioned how much money she was able to make in such a short period of time. Everything sounded too good to be true.

I kept my eyes peeled. She kept on succeeding. So, out of curiosity and almost desperation, I reached out.

During our phone conversation, I learned about the compensation plan, which sounded promising. She made the point that I already spent a lot of time on social media, so why not get paid for it? (that definitely spoke to my soul haha).

She explained how I could make as little or as much money as I wanted depending on how much time I was willing to put in (I’m an all or nothing kind of gal, so stars flashed in my eyes).

She also informed me that in order to join the business, I would have to purchase a set of the products (a rude awakening to the fact that this was not a get sent free product to promote type of gig).

That made me nervous, but she assured me that the kit was fully refundable within 30 days if I decided I didn’t like them or that the whole thing wasn’t for me.

She told me how simple it was for her to recruit girls to join her team and gain customers because the product sold itself. She showed me pictures of some of the girls in her upline and told me how much money they were making.

Like $20,000-$100,000 per month. I was SHOCKED. She explained the science behind the product, why it was so effective, and how her hair was thriving after just a few washes.

Other benefits she mentioned included the community and 24/7 support I’d receive from virtual training to group chats. Things are a little fuzzy because this was over 2 years ago, but all I remember is that when I got off the phone, I was SOLD and I didn’t even know the name of the company.

I didn’t even notice that small detail until I mentioned it to Adam. I needed to talk to him about it because the starter kit of products she recommended I buy was $299, which was a big commitment for something I’d never tried before, but I saw it as an investment and a huge possibility.

He didn’t do it. He called it a scam right away. He turned it off so quickly that my head spun and my heart sank. From the start, he was extremely unsupportive and skeptical.

He then asked if I knew what the company’s name was and if I had done any research on it. I told him no, embarrassed. He advised me to do some research before making such a large commitment. He was correct. So I enquired of a friend, who informed me that the company’s name was MONAT.

Instead of going to the company’s website, I googled MONAT and found some terrifying results. Hair loss, scalp sores, and flakes are all symptoms of alopecia. I mentioned it to a friend and inquired if the company had addressed these issues publicly yet because they were VERY BAD.

She began by discussing a “detox” process that MONAT products put your hair through (I ended up going through a couple of these and it sucked). It was difficult to explain to others and to talk girls down when it happened to them as well.)

She claims that because the ingredients are all natural, the formula strips the hair and draws all the impurities to the surface, which manifests differently in each individual.

Some people had more shedding that appeared to be hair loss but wasn’t (a growth phase that I understood due to my bio background), extreme grease that could last for days or weeks, a dry flaking scalp, and some people were simply allergic.

She claims that the majority of people who leave these reviews don’t understand the detox and don’t stick with it long enough to see it through. The media has a tendency to exaggerate things, which made sense to me.

She also claimed that certain people in the beauty industry were out to get MONAT and had planted negative press. She also sent me a CNN case study in which they conducted extensive testing and demonstrated that the products were safe and that all of the claims were false.

That was beneficial. Finally, she told me that none of her customers had ever had a bad experience with her and that her hair was the best it had ever been. I’d seen her hair on social media and thought it looked better. I also didn’t believe she’d lie to me, so I trusted her.

I brought it up again with Adam, and he was still unsupportive. I told her he wasn’t down, and she was gracious and understanding. I continued to follow her for the next two months, watching as she became increasingly successful. I reasoned that if she could do it, I could certainly do it.

She kept reaching out, and it became increasingly difficult to say no because I really wanted to do it. Finally, I told Adam that while I would appreciate his support, I was going to do it anyway to SHOW HIM that I could do it. I started in early September and got right to work.

Also Read:

How to get 1 dollar from everyone?

How does MONAT Work? 

MONAT’s primary revenue streams are as follows:

1. Customers who only purchase products from you. They can either buy retail (which is much more expensive) or join the VIP program, which has a one-time fee of $20 to join but provides the customer with a discount, free shipping on orders of $84 or more, and a free product. (This is what we pushed, or what I was taught to push, because they became repeat customers.)

How does MONAT Work

They were also subject to the same 30-day return policy. The only drawback to the VIP program is that the customer is then enrolled in flexships. Similar to an autoship program, but the product’s shipping date can be changed and continually pushed back.

You just have to remember to push it back, which not everyone does, resulting in irate customers when they are charged $84 or more and returns are not free. You earn 30% on retail customers and 15% on VIP customers.

2. Recruiting female teammates for your team. You earn a one-time flat rate from the girl signing up, based on the product pack she selects. However, that sum is insignificant in comparison to how much money you can make if she succeeds in business, which brings me to the next way you can make money:

3. Extras. Bonuses are awarded based on your hitting rank. There are different requirements for each rank, but they all include a personal sales goal, a group sales goal, and a goal number of active lines beneath you (girls who have brought in at least $200 of personal volume that month). You get a bonus every time you reach a new rank.

However, you will only receive a bonus check if you reach a rank for the first time. If you keep a certain rank month after month, you will only be earning commissions from your own personal customers.

Once you reach a certain rank, you begin earning a percentage of your group sales (revenue brought in by the girls on your team), but that rank is more difficult to achieve.

As a result, when people post the average monthly earnings of the MONAT ranks, it can be a little misleading because income varies greatly at each rank. However, if you are successful and quickly rise through the ranks, you can make a TON of money doing this.

Other ways to make money exist, but these are the most basic. Aside from that, I liked how you could be your own boss and work your own hours.

I also liked how you could outrank the person who invited you in. They can’t just sit there and do nothing while you kill yourself and make a fortune off of it. That was pretty cool and fair, in my opinion.

Now, back to the story. 

Things did not take off as quickly as I had hoped (for example, I did not reach my first rank in my first week, as the girl who recruited me did). I discovered she’s a one-of-a-kind case.) But I was in it for the long haul, and I knew it wouldn’t be easy.

I believe I reached first place in my second month and third place the following month. My third month, I received my smart start bonus and a new rank, and I used the money to pay our rent and buy groceries for the month.

That was unquestionably my highest high. I’d never seen such a large check before. But then I got stuck at the fourth rank for months, which was extremely discouraging because the real money begins when you reach the fifth rank (MMB), and I was doing everything I could to get there.

It was NOT easy, and I was spending a LOT of time on social media interacting with girls, posting CONSTANTLY, going live, reaching out to people I knew and people I didn’t know, listening to trainings, and creating tons of content. I was committed.

I’d even get up from my dinner with Adam or friends to take calls or jump on calls with my team. I lived and breathed MONAT, and Adam was never as supportive as I needed him to be. We definitely had a few heated arguments and fights about it.

That was the most difficult part. My work with MONAT also began to interfere with my focus in school because I was so hungry and desperate to get into these ranks, to be an example to my team, to prove something to Adam that I would work during lectures and late at night.

It had a strong psychological impact on me. I couldn’t stop thinking about it. “What could I do better?” What more could I do for my company, for my girls?” I was constantly looking at my phone. I didn’t set any limits for myself and worked around the clock.

I had a good number of people come to me. I think I had about 35-40 people on my team at one point, but I quickly learned that recruiting people is pointless if they don’t work. You couldn’t want it for them or work for them at the same time. There were only so many things you could do.

The issue I had with MONAT’s comp plan was that you could be working your tail off, but if the people below you weren’t, you could only go so far. You’d hit your compensation plan cap and be stuck at a rank for months, which is exactly what happened to me.

The free car isn’t completely free either (nothing ever is). You must reach a certain rank and earn a certain amount of money for them to cover it, and if you underperform, you are responsible for your own car payment.

I know some girls who started even before I did (in September 2018) and have just barely reached the rank that qualifies you for the “free” car, and it breaks my heart because I know how hard she works and how difficult it is to fail month after month despite so much time and dedication. Congratulations to her for not giving up.

Reaching out began to feel yucky and ingenuous somewhere in the middle. I mean, it wasn’t unbearable. But I didn’t enjoy it. I mean, I genuinely desired it for everyone. I was rooting for the girls on my team to succeed.

It wasn’t all about me all of the time. I knew this business could be a huge blessing for someone because it wasn’t a scam, I was making decent money, and there were other girls making a ton of money, but I started feeling like I always had a hidden agenda when I was talking to someone, and I hated that.

That version of myself didn’t sit well with me. I wanted to share and talk to someone because I liked them and wanted to, not because I wanted to recruit them to my team and make money off of them.

There were girls I knew could do really well, and I genuinely wanted to help them get there for themselves, but I also wanted to be friends with people without the pressure of pitching them.

I despised being that person. I also found myself drawing on my experience that one month when I was able to pay my rent and then some with my MONAT income when recruiting girls, but that was only true for one or two months out of my entire time doing this, and using that felt extremely icky.

But I went ahead and did it anyway. That’s probably why I don’t trust people who work in MLMs anymore; their friendliness, compliments, and concern feel phony, and I suspect they’re faking numbers.

They may be the nicest person I’ve ever met, but I know they’re only interested in me because it will benefit them the most. They wouldn’t if they didn’t have to. I believe I’ve developed some trust issues haha.

Another thing was that I was a huge fan of the products, knew they worked, and still won’t use anything else to this day, but I didn’t have my own crazy amazing hair transformation to post about, which made it a little harder to reel customers in on social media at times.

I also don’t have crazy amazing hair, so it’s not like people were constantly asking me about it. Fortunately, I was still able to create a lot of value around the products and I was very good at selling them, but the price definitely made a lot of girls think twice, which I completely understood because I thought/think they were a little pricey as well.

After 10 months, I lost my spark and burned myself out. I was tired of the drama it caused with friends I had recruited, of constantly being on social media all the time, reaching out to strangers I didn’t want to talk about something I was no longer successful in, and of the stigma surrounding MLMs, which always drew staring eyes and annoying jokes from “friends.”

I grew tired of becoming emotionally invested in other people’s successes and failures. My emotions were tied to their decisions. That was my fault, but it’s always disappointing when you spend time on something or someone, get your hopes up, and then nothing happens.

But I feel like I gave it my all. I did make a decent living. But not enough for the number of hours I was putting in (as Adam was always reminding me, which felt GREAT) but it was the truth. It was also difficult because I never received his full support.

Some people can and do benefit from MLMs and MONAT. I discovered that curly haired girls, fried blonde haired girls, cosmetologists, hair stylists, makeup artists, or people known for their interest in beauty or clean products can really kill it with MONAT.

They are already trusted and well-known for doing things like this. However, your immediate success in this business is highly dependent on the type of person people know you to be before you join.

Do you already have a devoted fan base? Do people already have faith in you? Do you have any other valuable topics to discuss and post about that will benefit others? Do you have a passion for hair (and skincare) in relation to MONAT?

There are numerous ways to market, but are you comfortable using social media to its full potential, or are you willing to learn how? Are you going to expose yourself? It will be uncomfortable at times.

Is what you post about whatever product you’re trying to sell going to seem so out of the blue and unlike you, or so far off from what people know you’re interested in, that people won’t trust you?

This is the type of business where you have to be willing to GRIND for a year before you see significant results. You must first lay the groundwork. It takes a lot of effort and determination, but you CAN do it. It IS possible to achieve success. You simply have to take everything into account.

I hope this is useful to anyone considering joining or who has graduated from MONAT. I still adore and use the products, and I wholeheartedly recommend them! They’ve made my hair so healthy, shiny, and full of growth.

In this post, I just tried to be as honest and objective as possible about what it’s like to work for/with MONAT. This was just my personal experience; everyone’s is unique. It’s not for everyone, but I believe it’s always worthwhile to try something new.

This type of business can fit many people’s lifestyles and provide a nice source of extra income. However, if you are a member of any MLM, I wish you the best of luck!

Is Monat A Scam?

With so much contradictory information available, you may be wondering, “Is Monat a scam?”

Many of the articles about Monat you’ve read are from 2018, when the company’s name went viral, but not for the reasons that most companies go viral.

Is Monat A Scam

Thousands of people complained about Monat and its products, with the most common complaint being that the products cause horrible side effects such as hair loss.

Years later, Monat is still on the market, and many people are still skeptical of the validity of the claims on both sides, positive and negative.

Today, as we reveal the claims from 2018, we will learn what Monat is and whether it is a scam in 2020. Is it true that those claims are still being made today? Is Monat FDA-approved?

Let us investigate.

What Is Monat?

First, let’s go over what Monat is and the Monat products that are available.

Monat is a hair care MLM company founded in October 2014 by Luis Urdaneta. Monat’s corporate headquarters are in Florida.

Monat products are said to be “naturally-based” and “absolutely safe,” containing over 13 natural plant and essential oils. The products are divided into four categories: hair, skin, wellness, and now pet care.

Monat received numerous awards for being a rapidly growing company, owing to all of the “market partners” who promoted the brand and its products. In fact, the company made $200 million in revenue in 2017.

Monat, on the other hand, received hundreds of complaints about their products in 2018. Irritation, redness, hair loss, a lack of integrity, deceptive practices, and other issues were among those raised.

Before we can decide whether Monat is a scam, we must first understand what an MLM company is and how it operates.

What Exactly Is An MLM?

Multi-Level-Marketing (MLM) companies typically generate revenue from their products and services by having people sell to one another. In other words, if you worked for an MLM, you would be selling products to other people directly.

As a seller, you can increase your earnings and commissions by recruiting others to work for the company under you. You would be creating a sales network known as a “downline.”

You can also make money by meeting various selling bonuses and other rewards that the company may offer you, but these goals are often unrealistic and unattainable.

This may appear to be a simple way to make quick money. That’s how you get drawn in. In reality, you are unlikely to make a profit. In fact, according to the FTC, less than 1% of MLM participants make a profit.

Despite the fact that making a profit with an MLM company is nearly impossible, MLM companies are legitimate and legal. There are, however, many companies that pose as MLMs but are not. These businesses are known as Pyramid Schemes, and they are all scams.

What Exactly Is A Pyramid Scheme? 

Pyramid schemes promote the idea of a lucrative business opportunity. As a seller in a pyramid scheme, you are expected to recruit more people for an ostensibly “money-making opportunity,” but you never have a product to offer them. Those people will also pay in advance.

Whether you make money or not, you and your recruits are always required to pay. The only person making money is at the top of the pyramid, while everyone else is dishing it out.

No matter how hard you work, you will never be able to recruit enough people to make a living. You’ll be working so hard to achieve impossible goals while continuing to lose money.

That is how the scheme survives. People are so invested in the idea of making money that they are oblivious to the fact that they are still paying for the possibility of wealth while never moving closer to it.

What Was The Monat Lawsuit About?

So, my friend…

I’m glad you inquired.

Once upon a time, a woman named Vickie Harrington started a Facebook group to share her experience with Monat, specifically how it caused hair loss, scalp irritation, and sores, among other things.

What Was The Monat Lawsuit About

The group quickly grew to over 12,000 members, the majority of whom had similar experiences with Monat products.

Instead of doing what most businesses do and reaching out to the woman to help her resolve her problem, Monat sued her for $225,000 on January 26, 2018. Monat claimed the woman was slandering the company’s name by “spreading harmful information about Monat’s products that she knew to be false.”

Now, I’m no business expert, but since when do companies sue customers for complaining about a bad experience?

To add insult to injury, Monat’s president claimed that Harrington was being paid by their adversary to drag Monat. Of course, this is an accusation that was laughed at and dismissed as absurd at the very least.

Despite the fact that the Monat spokesperson does not agree, many Monat sellers claim that the hair loss side effects are part of a hair “detox.” In case you didn’t already know, hair loss is NOT a side effect of hair detoxing.

Can you imagine being sued by a company because you had a bad experience and met others who had the same problem?

Does Monat Cause Hair Loss?

So, the big question is whether Monat actually causes hair loss. Anyone who tries to sell you Monat products will politely decline. Senior management at Monat will also say no. Many disgruntled customers said yes in 2018, and they are still saying it in 2020.

Monat claims that their hair products “do not damage hair”:

Many of the women who filed 1,030 complaints with the BBB in the last three years had hair loss and other troubling symptoms. I’ll give you a few recent examples that I discovered.

Does Monat Cause Hair Loss

After only three washes, this woman’s hair was falling out in large clumps.

Another person claimed that her scalp was extremely red and sensitive after only two washes. She mentions that the weight of her hair was too much for her to bear, so she cut it all off.

This woman claims that after only a few months of using Monat, her hair began to fall out in chunks, and she now has almost no hair left. She also claims that many of the Monat sellers suffer from hair loss, but they continue to sell it.

So, despite Monat’s claims that their products do not cause hair loss, I am not going to take any chances. However, you are free to make your own choices in this regard.

Which products have allegedly been linked to hair loss? 

The majority of the reports about Monat products causing hair loss have been anecdotal.

To make matters even more complicated, many people who claim to have lost hair due to Monat were using multiple Monat products when their symptoms first appeared.

Because Monat is supposed to prevent hair loss, when these customers noticed their hair falling out, they increased the number of Monat products they were using. Finally, they decided that Monat was the cause of their hair loss rather than the solution.

Because this appears to be a fairly common occurrence, pinpointing which product (if any) caused the hair loss, breakage, and skin irritation is nearly impossible.

The following items are frequently mentioned in online consumer complaints:

Shampoo with Intense Repair Treatment

Leave-In Conditioner for Intense Repair Treatment

Intensive Rejuvenique Oil Treatment

Over 300 claims about Monat products have been investigated by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). The Better Business Bureau (BBB) received hundreds of complaints about Monat products in a three-day period in 2018, prompting the BBB to remove the company’s reviews from its website. Monat is not currently BBB-accredited.

Is it true that Monat products cause hair loss? 

Simply put, we don’t know whether Monat products caused hair loss in the customers who filed class-action lawsuits against the company.

Monat conducted independent clinical trials to prove that their hair care products are safe in order to clear the air around its brand. These clinical trials cannot be considered unbiased because Monat funded them. Monat’s research found that their proprietary blend of botanical ingredients is safe and effective for everyday use.

Capixyl (which contains red clover extract from Trusted Source) is an active ingredient in several Monat products. There is research to back up the use of red clover extract to promote hair growth. There is no evidence that capixyl causes baldness or hair loss.

Procataline, a proprietary blend found in some Monat products, is said to function as an antioxidant, protecting your hair from environmental damage. Pea extract is included in this herbal blend.

A 2020 research study

With only ten volunteers, Trusted Source discovered that applying pea sprout extract to the scalp promoted hair growth. This study had no negative side effects, but more research is clearly needed.

According to the research, there is no reason to believe that Monat products cause hair loss. However, this does not mean that it has never occurred or that the products do not cause negative side effects in some people.

Are Monat products safe to use? 

Monat products are most likely safe for the vast majority of users. There may be horror stories and negative reviews online, but there are also many satisfied customers who return to the business time and time again.

The ideal Monat customer has no sensitivities or allergies to Monat ingredients. Of course, you could have a sensitivity and not realize it until you use Monat and have a negative reaction.

If you are allergic to botanical ingredients such as essential oils, or if you have a sensitive scalp, you should avoid Monat products. People with eczema, dandruff, scalp psoriasis, or other inflammatory scalp conditions should avoid it.

Because the evidence for Monat’s effectiveness is mostly provided by Monat, it’s difficult to say how well the products actually work.

If you have an underlying health condition that puts you at a higher risk of hair loss, or if your hair has been damaged by chemical treatments or bleaching, Monat cannot help you.

The products are designed to add volume and shine to thin hair. Monat is not intended to be a substitute for medical treatment of female pattern hair loss or alopecia areata.

The Houston influencer who was discovered dead on the side of the road worked for a contentious hair care MLM.

Alexis Sharkey, 26, was discovered dead on the side of the road in Houston on November 28. She had been building a business as a budding Instagram personality.

Sharkey’s mother, Stacey Robinault, told Insider in an interview that Sharkey had a talent for making people “feel good,” and that she was excellent at her job.

Sharkey, whose legal name is Alexis Robinault, worked as a “mentor” for Monat, a global company that markets its products through direct-to-consumer salespeople, also known as multi-level marketing (MLM). The Federal Trade Commission (FTC) has warned that “most people who join legitimate MLMs make little or no money.” MLM practices have been widely criticized for being predatory in their recruitment.

Monat, which is known for giving away luxurious vacations and prizes to its top sellers, has also been investigated by Florida’s attorney general after hundreds of customers claimed that its products caused hair loss and other symptoms. The investigation was concluded when the company agreed to a five-year communication plan with the office and was “permanently barred” from making “false or misleading statements in its marketing and sale of its beauty products.”

Sharkey found other Monat salespeople on Instagram, where she had approximately 20,000 followers at the time of her death. Sharkey now has 69,000 followers following the news of the 26-year-death, old’s the circumstances of which are still being investigated by Houston police.

In a statement, a Monat spokesperson told Insider, “Alexis Sharkey was a wonderful, warm, and well-liked independent MONAT market partner. We are deeply saddened by her untimely death, and our hearts go out to her family and friends who loved her.”

Monat has over 2 million customers and 400,000 independent contractors who “who sell the most safe and effective premium hair care, skin care and wellness products.” according to a spokesperson.

Alexis Sharkey ‘loved’ selling Monat products, according to her mother, who stated that Sharkey began working with Monat in the middle of 2018, based on her Instagram posts. Sharkey wrote in a June 2019 caption that her Monat business “has forever changed how I think and my life.”

Sharkey “thoroughly researched” Monat, according to Robinault, before deciding to sell the company’s products. Sharkey thought Monat’s products were “excellent” “And so she went through the process of educating herself on how to market and how to grow and how to build a business,” Robinault explained.

Robinault, on the other hand, was taken aback when her daughter began working for Monat in 2018. Sharkey disliked the fundraising activities required for sports teams in high school and forced her younger sister to sell products for her instead, Robinault recalled.

“The fact that my daughter’s livelihood is based on selling and marketing this product line just blows my mind because that is never, ever something I would’ve seen her do. And she did it so well, and she’s really into it “Insider spoke with Robinault.

Sharkey majored in biology in college and considered attending medical school. She moved from her small Pennsylvania town to the south after graduation, where she worked at a bar and “bounced around” in various cities before moving to Houston with her husband, Tom Sharkey, in January.

“She went down a totally different road, and she’s happy with it, and if she was happy with her life, I was happy for her,” Robinault said, adding that Sharkey was “very good” at selling Monat products and “and she loved it.”

“I think that she was building it enough that she was going to build herself this business to sustain her life,” she explained.

Robinault claims that her daughter was murdered. The circumstances surrounding Sharkey’s death are still unknown, as investigators await the results of a final autopsy. According to Houston police, she was discovered naked and with no visible injuries.

Monat operates as a cosmetics company that employs standard multi-level marketing techniques.

The Urdaneta family founded Monat in 2014, initially selling hair products and later expanding to include skincare products. “MONAT begins with a hair change and progresses to a life change. We provide a generous compensation package, an exceptionally nurturing support system, and caring, committed leaders who treat you as if you were family “According to the company’s website.

Monat’s business model is described as “direct sales/social marketing” on its website, and the company “bypasses traditional retail channels in favor of a person-to-person focus.”

MLM is used by some of the most well-known companies, including Arbonne and Mary Kay.

According to Sharkey’s Instagram profile, people who sell Monat products call themselves “mentors,” but the company appears to refer to them as “Market Partners” on its website. These salespeople recruit more salespeople, primarily through social media, and assist them in launching their own businesses by selling Monat products.

MLM companies, such as Monat, frequently reward top salespeople with luxury vacations and other glitzy gifts, such as cars. Many MLMs are chastised for selling salespeople on unrealistic success stories and rewards that are out of reach for the majority of salespeople. Sharkey shared photos from Monat’s “Passport” celebration in Cancun on Instagram in November 2019. “I must say, it’s nice working with a company that goes out of their way to make sure you feel loved and spoiled to death on the first night of your all paid vacation,” she wrote in the caption of the post.

Sharkey wrote in another post, “Off to company training,”

Though social media may provide a glamorous and vibrant view of MLM companies, many people who are drawn into MLM models have negative experiences.

Salespeople recruit not only new customers, but also new salespeople, in companies that employ MLM practices. Sharkey’s September 2019 Instagram post urged her followers to stop making “excuses” for not having time to sell Monat products as a side hustle and invited them to join a conference call to learn more.

These concerns are highlighted in a 2011 report by Jon M. Taylor, president of the Consumer Awareness Institute, an independent consumer advocacy and research organization.

“Built on an endless chain of recruitment,” Taylor writes in the report, “MLM is inherently flawed, deceptive, and profitable only for founders and those at or near the top of a pyramid of participants, usually those at the beginning of the chain of recruitment.” “MLM is also extremely viral and predatory.”

During the pandemic, many MLMs, including Monat, used these tactics to recruit newly unemployed Americans, according to Business Insider in April.

“The companies are so desperate to get people to join now, so they’ve really amped up their recruitment,” Emma Rose, a former network-sales distributor who now hosts “The Anti-MLM Podcast,” previously told Business Insider’s Paige Leskin in the spring. “They’re banking on the fact that people are scared and looking for help. They’re all selling assurances.”

According to Business Insider, MLM brands frequently position salespeople to appear financially successful with glamorous social-media posts, but the actual details of the money-making in selling the products are more complicated. According to Taylor’s Consumer Awareness Institute report, “MLM makes even gambling look like a safe bet in comparison,”

According to the FTC, some businesses that appear to be functional brands using MLMs are actually “pyramid schemes,” that make money by recruiting new salespeople rather than selling products.

Even in legitimate MLM businesses, however, the FTC warns that most salespeople “make little to no money,” some lose money, and some go into debt. According to a 2017 Quartz article, many people recruited into MLMs have psychological issues and are in debt.

Why I stopped selling Monat: For over a year, I’ve been using Monat products. They did, in fact, appear to have aided me. My hair looked better than it had in a long time. Simply put, I fell for the deception. I used to be one of those ‘boss babes.’ I sold to family and friends, defending the price, the ingredients, and the company.

And when I was going through quarantine and had to cut back on selling, my ‘network of bffs’ was nowhere to be found. They kicked me out of the group chat because I wasn’t selling anything. No one ever texted, called, or inquired about my well-being.

My upline didn’t reach out until I was on social media talking about starting my own business (as a pet groomer so I’d be a real business owner), only to suggest that I start selling again to make the money to start my business.

After losing contact with them, I finally began to make sense. I began to notice things that I had previously dismissed: I was losing more hair in the shower, and my scalp was extremely itchy.

Looking back, it’s a shame that I fell for it and convinced so many of my friends and family to buy this product. I’m relieved to report that I’m NO LONGER IN!

That being said, can anyone recommend some natural hair care products? The entire reason I was drawn to Monat was because they claimed to be ‘plant-based vegan haircare.’ So, if anyone has any good ideas that actually work, I’m all ears.

Why I stopped selling Monat

Then I went through all of Monat’s negative reviews to see if anyone else had had the same experience as me.

So, even before August, I had stopped really selling it because the way they want you to do things is completely contrary to my morals and personality, and it made me uncomfortable.

I’ve mentioned it before, but basically, I could go on a spree and talk 20 people into joining my business in one month (probably in a spammy-pushy kind of way), rank up, earn a lot of money, and then….

My friend had given me a set and raved about it, sounding like an expert herself. It is not necessary to be a licensed professional.

Why? They sell shampoo that is so acidic that it removes color from your hair and causes hair loss.

My hair was happier when I used a cheap grocery store product, so I stopped using their products for that reason.

They would have probably let it go if I hadn’t mentioned Monat, a company that poses a threat to the natural products they sell.

Why? As you can probably tell, I was furious about it. That’s right, Monat allows anyone to sell their product, whether or not they know anything about hair.

The products at the salon I go to (or used to go to) are great and popular, but they made me itchy and weren’t for me.

The packaging is low-quality; bottles do not seal well, and tubes split open. I’ve been using Monat products for about a year, and the quality of the products, particularly the skincare, is not what they claim (eye cream).

Even if she only worked 20 days, that works out to $7.50 per hour. 151. I also experienced severe itching for several days after using hair care products.

I was furious when I discovered everything. This is a powerful chemical. When you request an SDS sheet, they require you to sign a waiver agreeing not to share the information.

His girlfriend’s hair wasn’t damaged in any way, so I’m guessing she didn’t even use the product she was fucking selling to my sister. Archived. Tumbleweeds. The eye cream I bought was rancid or spoiled, and it smelled awful.

To deter spammers and network marketers who do not want to build a long-term business.

2 years ago by Posted by My ex-best friend (best friend for fucking 21 years, and his cunt girlfriend ruined our friendship) is dating a girl who sold my sister money, which ruined her hair.

I decided to try MONAT for the first time yesterday. She’s working 12-hour days selling Monat, but she’s now bragging about receiving an 1800-dollar bonus check for the month. Close.

She’s working 12-hour days selling Monat, but she’s now bragging about receiving an 1800-dollar bonus check for the month.

Why I Became a Member and Why I Left MONAT

It was my first summer as a married woman (2018). My husband and I had recently relocated to San Antonio for his summer job (which also provides the income we rely on the rest of the year), and I was feeling extremely lonely.

At the time, I was taking an online calculus class and trying to teach myself calculus for hours every day while my husband worked from 9 a.m. to 9 p.m. It was a dreadful day.

I ended up spending an unhealthy amount of time on social media as a result of being alone all day. Both scrolling and sharing are possible. But with no real purpose. It was unsatisfying. I wanted to make a difference in some way.

I enjoyed assisting others. I was passionate about so many things that I didn’t know which path to take. Did I mention I was completely alone? I went through a bit of an identity crisis. That much time alone will drive you insane. Hahaa.

It was also my first year of marriage, and I was going through a lot of growing pains. I’ve never been the type of girl who planned to marry and then rely on her husband for everything.

Actually, a guy was never in my plans. Sure, I had relationships, but when I imagined my future, all I saw was a powerful CEO – someone who had worked for themselves and was financially secure.

Someone who didn’t require a man! And now I’m in San Antonio, Texas, having followed my husband out here, feeling completely aimless and a little useless. Maybe you’re trapped? Idk.

I also felt like I had to ask permission to buy things that weren’t absolutely necessary because he was the one making all of the money. THAT WAS THE WORST THING EVER. It felt like I was asking my father for his credit card, which I despised.

I wished I could contribute financially in some way, but I couldn’t because of my schoolwork. He was perfectly fine with it, but I wasn’t.

I’d also recently decided that I wasn’t going to medical or pharmacy school because I didn’t want to either have kids during school, wait until I was 30 to have kids, or go to all of that schooling and then not use any of it because I was too busy taking care of kids.

I was also knee-deep in determining what my extremely difficult, nearly completed bio degree could do for me or what I could do with it. I worked as a CASE. hahahah.

It was probably in the middle of the summer when I saw another girl whose husband worked for the same company as mine, but in a different region, posting about this fantastic opportunity.

She emphasized the ability to work from anywhere (who wouldn’t want that? ), making money through social media (hello, I spent HOURS on that shiz), and these amazing hair products.

It sounded like you were some kind of influencer. She also mentioned how much money she was able to make in such a short period of time. Everything sounded too good to be true.

I kept my eyes peeled. She kept on succeeding. So, out of curiosity and almost desperation, I reached out.

During our phone conversation, I learned about the compensation plan, which sounded promising. She made the point that I already spent a lot of time on social media, so why not get paid for it? (that definitely spoke to my soul haha).

She explained how I could make as little or as much money as I wanted depending on how much time I was willing to put in (I’m an all or nothing kind of gal, so stars flashed in my eyes).

She also informed me that in order to join the business, I would have to purchase a set of the products (a rude awakening to the fact that this was not a get sent free product to promote type of gig).

That made me nervous, but she assured me that the kit was fully refundable within 30 days if I decided I didn’t like them or that the whole thing wasn’t for me.

She told me how simple it was for her to recruit girls to join her team and gain customers because the product sold itself. She showed me pictures of some of the girls in her upline and told me how much money they were making.

Like $20,000-$100,000 per month. I was SHOCKED. She explained the science behind the product, why it was so effective, and how her hair was thriving after just a few washes.

Other benefits she mentioned included the community and 24/7 support I’d receive from virtual training to group chats. Things are a little fuzzy because this was over 2 years ago, but all I remember is that when I got off the phone, I was SOLD and I didn’t even know the name of the company.

I didn’t even notice that small detail until I mentioned it to Adam. I needed to talk to him about it because the starter kit of products she recommended I buy was $299, which was a big commitment for something I’d never tried before, but I saw it as an investment and a huge possibility.

He didn’t do it. He called it a scam right away. He turned it off so quickly that my head spun and my heart sank. From the start, he was extremely unsupportive and skeptical.

He then asked if I knew what the company’s name was and if I had done any research on it. I told him no, embarrassed. He advised me to do some research before making such a large commitment. He was correct. So I enquired of a friend, who informed me that the company’s name was MONAT.

Instead of going to the company’s website, I googled MONAT and found some terrifying results. Hair loss, scalp sores, and flakes are all symptoms of alopecia. I mentioned it to a friend and inquired if the company had addressed these issues publicly yet because they were VERY BAD.

She began by discussing a “detox” process that MONAT products put your hair through (I ended up going through a couple of these and it sucked). It was difficult to explain to others and to talk girls down when it happened to them as well.)

She claims that because the ingredients are all natural, the formula strips the hair and draws all the impurities to the surface, which manifests differently in each individual.

Some people had more shedding that appeared to be hair loss but wasn’t (a growth phase that I understood due to my bio background), extreme grease that could last for days or weeks, a dry flaking scalp, and some people were simply allergic.

She claims that the majority of people who leave these reviews don’t understand the detox and don’t stick with it long enough to see it through. The media has a tendency to exaggerate things, which made sense to me.

She also claimed that certain people in the beauty industry were out to get MONAT and had planted negative press. She also sent me a CNN case study in which they conducted extensive testing and demonstrated that the products were safe and that all of the claims were false.

That was beneficial. Finally, she told me that none of her customers had ever had a bad experience with her and that her hair was the best it had ever been. I’d seen her hair on social media and thought it looked better. I also didn’t believe she’d lie to me, so I trusted her.

I brought it up again with Adam, and he was still unsupportive. I told her he wasn’t down, and she was gracious and understanding. I continued to follow her for the next two months, watching as she became increasingly successful. I reasoned that if she could do it, I could certainly do it.

She kept reaching out, and it became increasingly difficult to say no because I really wanted to do it. Finally, I told Adam that while I would appreciate his support, I was going to do it anyway to SHOW HIM that I could do it. I started in early September and got right to work.

How does MONAT Work? 

MONAT’s primary revenue streams are as follows:

1. Customers who only purchase products from you. They can either buy retail (which is much more expensive) or join the VIP program, which has a one-time fee of $20 to join but provides the customer with a discount, free shipping on orders of $84 or more, and a free product. (This is what we pushed, or what I was taught to push, because they became repeat customers.)

They were also subject to the same 30-day return policy. The only drawback to the VIP program is that the customer is then enrolled in flexships. Similar to an autoship program, but the product’s shipping date can be changed and continually pushed back.

You just have to remember to push it back, which not everyone does, resulting in irate customers when they are charged $84 or more and returns are not free. You earn 30% on retail customers and 15% on VIP customers.

2. Recruiting female teammates for your team. You earn a one-time flat rate from the girl signing up, based on the product pack she selects. However, that sum is insignificant in comparison to how much money you can make if she succeeds in business, which brings me to the next way you can make money:

3. Extras. Bonuses are awarded based on your hitting rank. There are different requirements for each rank, but they all include a personal sales goal, a group sales goal, and a goal number of active lines beneath you (girls who have brought in at least $200 of personal volume that month). You get a bonus every time you reach a new rank.

However, you will only receive a bonus check if you reach a rank for the first time. If you keep a certain rank month after month, you will only be earning commissions from your own personal customers.

Once you reach a certain rank, you begin earning a percentage of your group sales (revenue brought in by the girls on your team), but that rank is more difficult to achieve.

As a result, when people post the average monthly earnings of the MONAT ranks, it can be a little misleading because income varies greatly at each rank. However, if you are successful and quickly rise through the ranks, you can make a TON of money doing this.

Other ways to make money exist, but these are the most basic. Aside from that, I liked how you could be your own boss and work your own hours.

I also liked how you could outrank the person who invited you in. They can’t just sit there and do nothing while you kill yourself and make a fortune off of it. That was pretty cool and fair, in my opinion.

Now, back to the story. 

Things did not take off as quickly as I had hoped (for example, I did not reach my first rank in my first week, as the girl who recruited me did). I discovered she’s a one-of-a-kind case.) But I was in it for the long haul, and I knew it wouldn’t be easy.

I believe I reached first place in my second month and third place the following month. My third month, I received my smart start bonus and a new rank, and I used the money to pay our rent and buy groceries for the month.

That was unquestionably my highest high. I’d never seen such a large check before. But then I got stuck at the fourth rank for months, which was extremely discouraging because the real money begins when you reach the fifth rank (MMB), and I was doing everything I could to get there.

It was NOT easy, and I was spending a LOT of time on social media interacting with girls, posting CONSTANTLY, going live, reaching out to people I knew and people I didn’t know, listening to trainings, and creating tons of content. I was committed.

I’d even get up from my dinner with Adam or friends to take calls or jump on calls with my team. I lived and breathed MONAT, and Adam was never as supportive as I needed him to be. We definitely had a few heated arguments and fights about it.

That was the most difficult part. My work with MONAT also began to interfere with my focus in school because I was so hungry and desperate to get into these ranks, to be an example to my team, to prove something to Adam that I would work during lectures and late at night.

It had a strong psychological impact on me. I couldn’t stop thinking about it. “What could I do better?” What more could I do for my company, for my girls?” I was constantly looking at my phone. I didn’t set any limits for myself and worked around the clock.

I had a good number of people come to me. I think I had about 35-40 people on my team at one point, but I quickly learned that recruiting people is pointless if they don’t work. You couldn’t want it for them or work for them at the same time. There were only so many things you could do.

The issue I had with MONAT’s comp plan was that you could be working your tail off, but if the people below you weren’t, you could only go so far. You’d hit your compensation plan cap and be stuck at a rank for months, which is exactly what happened to me.

The free car isn’t completely free either (nothing ever is). You must reach a certain rank and earn a certain amount of money for them to cover it, and if you underperform, you are responsible for your own car payment.

I know some girls who started even before I did (in September 2018) and have just barely reached the rank that qualifies you for the “free” car, and it breaks my heart because I know how hard she works and how difficult it is to fail month after month despite so much time and dedication. Congratulations to her for not giving up.

Reaching out began to feel yucky and ingenuous somewhere in the middle. I mean, it wasn’t unbearable. But I didn’t enjoy it. I mean, I genuinely desired it for everyone. I was rooting for the girls on my team to succeed.

It wasn’t all about me all of the time. I knew this business could be a huge blessing for someone because it wasn’t a scam, I was making decent money, and there were other girls making a ton of money, but I started feeling like I always had a hidden agenda when I was talking to someone, and I hated that.

That version of myself didn’t sit well with me. I wanted to share and talk to someone because I liked them and wanted to, not because I wanted to recruit them to my team and make money off of them.

There were girls I knew could do really well, and I genuinely wanted to help them get there for themselves, but I also wanted to be friends with people without the pressure of pitching them.

I despised being that person. I also found myself drawing on my experience that one month when I was able to pay my rent and then some with my MONAT income when recruiting girls, but that was only true for one or two months out of my entire time doing this, and using that felt extremely icky.

But I went ahead and did it anyway. That’s probably why I don’t trust people who work in MLMs anymore; their friendliness, compliments, and concern feel phony, and I suspect they’re faking numbers.

They may be the nicest person I’ve ever met, but I know they’re only interested in me because it will benefit them the most. They wouldn’t if they didn’t have to. I believe I’ve developed some trust issues haha.

Another thing was that I was a huge fan of the products, knew they worked, and still won’t use anything else to this day, but I didn’t have my own crazy amazing hair transformation to post about, which made it a little harder to reel customers in on social media at times.

I also don’t have crazy amazing hair, so it’s not like people were constantly asking me about it. Fortunately, I was still able to create a lot of value around the products and I was very good at selling them, but the price definitely made a lot of girls think twice, which I completely understood because I thought/think they were a little pricey as well.

After 10 months, I lost my spark and burned myself out. I was tired of the drama it caused with friends I had recruited, of constantly being on social media all the time, reaching out to strangers I didn’t want to talk about something I was no longer successful in, and of the stigma surrounding MLMs, which always drew staring eyes and annoying jokes from “friends.”

I grew tired of becoming emotionally invested in other people’s successes and failures. My emotions were tied to their decisions. That was my fault, but it’s always disappointing when you spend time on something or someone, get your hopes up, and then nothing happens.

But I feel like I gave it my all. I did make a decent living. But not enough for the number of hours I was putting in (as Adam was always reminding me, which felt GREAT) but it was the truth. It was also difficult because I never received his full support.

Some people can and do benefit from MLMs and MONAT. I discovered that curly haired girls, fried blonde haired girls, cosmetologists, hair stylists, makeup artists, or people known for their interest in beauty or clean products can really kill it with MONAT.

They are already trusted and well-known for doing things like this. However, your immediate success in this business is highly dependent on the type of person people know you to be before you join.

Do you already have a devoted fan base? Do people already have faith in you? Do you have any other valuable topics to discuss and post about that will benefit others? Do you have a passion for hair (and skincare) in relation to MONAT?

There are numerous ways to market, but are you comfortable using social media to its full potential, or are you willing to learn how? Are you going to expose yourself? It will be uncomfortable at times.

Is what you post about whatever product you’re trying to sell going to seem so out of the blue and unlike you, or so far off from what people know you’re interested in, that people won’t trust you?

This is the type of business where you have to be willing to GRIND for a year before you see significant results. You must first lay the groundwork. It takes a lot of effort and determination, but you CAN do it. It IS possible to achieve success. You simply have to take everything into account.

I hope this is useful to anyone considering joining or who has graduated from MONAT. I still adore and use the products, and I wholeheartedly recommend them! They’ve made my hair so healthy, shiny, and full of growth.

In this post, I just tried to be as honest and objective as possible about what it’s like to work for/with MONAT. This was just my personal experience; everyone’s is unique. It’s not for everyone, but I believe it’s always worthwhile to try something new.

This type of business can fit many people’s lifestyles and provide a nice source of extra income. However, if you are a member of any MLM, I wish you the best of luck!

Is Monat A Scam?

With so much contradictory information available, you may be wondering, “Is Monat a scam?”

Many of the articles about Monat you’ve read are from 2018, when the company’s name went viral, but not for the reasons that most companies go viral.

Thousands of people complained about Monat and its products, with the most common complaint being that the products cause horrible side effects such as hair loss.

Years later, Monat is still on the market, and many people are still skeptical of the validity of the claims on both sides, positive and negative.

Today, as we reveal the claims from 2018, we will learn what Monat is and whether it is a scam in 2020. Is it true that those claims are still being made today? Is Monat FDA-approved?

Let us investigate.

What Is Monat?

First, let’s go over what Monat is and the Monat products that are available.

Monat is a hair care MLM company founded in October 2014 by Luis Urdaneta. Monat’s corporate headquarters are in Florida.

Monat products are said to be “naturally-based” and “absolutely safe,” containing over 13 natural plant and essential oils. The products are divided into four categories: hair, skin, wellness, and now pet care.

Monat received numerous awards for being a rapidly growing company, owing to all of the “market partners” who promoted the brand and its products. In fact, the company made $200 million in revenue in 2017.

Monat, on the other hand, received hundreds of complaints about their products in 2018. Irritation, redness, hair loss, a lack of integrity, deceptive practices, and other issues were among those raised.

Before we can decide whether Monat is a scam, we must first understand what an MLM company is and how it operates.

What Exactly Is An MLM?

Multi-Level-Marketing (MLM) companies typically generate revenue from their products and services by having people sell to one another. In other words, if you worked for an MLM, you would be selling products to other people directly.

As a seller, you can increase your earnings and commissions by recruiting others to work for the company under you. You would be creating a sales network known as a “downline.”

You can also make money by meeting various selling bonuses and other rewards that the company may offer you, but these goals are often unrealistic and unattainable.

This may appear to be a simple way to make quick money. That’s how you get drawn in. In reality, you are unlikely to make a profit. In fact, according to the FTC, less than 1% of MLM participants make a profit.

Despite the fact that making a profit with an MLM company is nearly impossible, MLM companies are legitimate and legal. There are, however, many companies that pose as MLMs but are not. These businesses are known as Pyramid Schemes, and they are all scams.

What Exactly Is A Pyramid Scheme? 

Pyramid schemes promote the idea of a lucrative business opportunity. As a seller in a pyramid scheme, you are expected to recruit more people for an ostensibly “money-making opportunity,” but you never have a product to offer them. Those people will also pay in advance.

Whether you make money or not, you and your recruits are always required to pay. The only person making money is at the top of the pyramid, while everyone else is dishing it out.

No matter how hard you work, you will never be able to recruit enough people to make a living. You’ll be working so hard to achieve impossible goals while continuing to lose money.

That is how the scheme survives. People are so invested in the idea of making money that they are oblivious to the fact that they are still paying for the possibility of wealth while never moving closer to it.

What Was The Monat Lawsuit About?

So, my friend…

I’m glad you inquired.

Once upon a time, a woman named Vickie Harrington started a Facebook group to share her experience with Monat, specifically how it caused hair loss, scalp irritation, and sores, among other things.

The group quickly grew to over 12,000 members, the majority of whom had similar experiences with Monat products.

Instead of doing what most businesses do and reaching out to the woman to help her resolve her problem, Monat sued her for $225,000 on January 26, 2018. Monat claimed the woman was slandering the company’s name by “spreading harmful information about Monat’s products that she knew to be false.”

Now, I’m no business expert, but since when do companies sue customers for complaining about a bad experience?

To add insult to injury, Monat’s president claimed that Harrington was being paid by their adversary to drag Monat. Of course, this is an accusation that was laughed at and dismissed as absurd at the very least.

Despite the fact that the Monat spokesperson does not agree, many Monat sellers claim that the hair loss side effects are part of a hair “detox.” In case you didn’t already know, hair loss is NOT a side effect of hair detoxing.

Can you imagine being sued by a company because you had a bad experience and met others who had the same problem?

Does Monat Cause Hair Loss?

So, the big question is whether Monat actually causes hair loss. Anyone who tries to sell you Monat products will politely decline. Senior management at Monat will also say no. Many disgruntled customers said yes in 2018, and they are still saying it in 2020.

Monat claims that their hair products “do not damage hair”:

Many of the women who filed 1,030 complaints with the BBB in the last three years had hair loss and other troubling symptoms. I’ll give you a few recent examples that I discovered.

After only three washes, this woman’s hair was falling out in large clumps.

Another person claimed that her scalp was extremely red and sensitive after only two washes. She mentions that the weight of her hair was too much for her to bear, so she cut it all off.

This woman claims that after only a few months of using Monat, her hair began to fall out in chunks, and she now has almost no hair left. She also claims that many of the Monat sellers suffer from hair loss, but they continue to sell it.

So, despite Monat’s claims that their products do not cause hair loss, I am not going to take any chances. However, you are free to make your own choices in this regard.

Which products have allegedly been linked to hair loss? 

The majority of the reports about Monat products causing hair loss have been anecdotal.

To make matters even more complicated, many people who claim to have lost hair due to Monat were using multiple Monat products when their symptoms first appeared.

Because Monat is supposed to prevent hair loss, when these customers noticed their hair falling out, they increased the number of Monat products they were using. Finally, they decided that Monat was the cause of their hair loss rather than the solution.

Because this appears to be a fairly common occurrence, pinpointing which product (if any) caused the hair loss, breakage, and skin irritation is nearly impossible.

The following items are frequently mentioned in online consumer complaints:

Shampoo with Intense Repair Treatment

Leave-In Conditioner for Intense Repair Treatment

Intensive Rejuvenique Oil Treatment

Over 300 claims about Monat products have been investigated by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). The Better Business Bureau (BBB) received hundreds of complaints about Monat products in a three-day period in 2018, prompting the BBB to remove the company’s reviews from its website. Monat is not currently BBB-accredited.

Is it true that Monat products cause hair loss? 

Simply put, we don’t know whether Monat products caused hair loss in the customers who filed class-action lawsuits against the company.

Monat conducted independent clinical trials to prove that their hair care products are safe in order to clear the air around its brand. These clinical trials cannot be considered unbiased because Monat funded them. Monat’s research found that their proprietary blend of botanical ingredients is safe and effective for everyday use.

Capixyl (which contains red clover extract from Trusted Source) is an active ingredient in several Monat products. There is research to back up the use of red clover extract to promote hair growth. There is no evidence that capixyl causes baldness or hair loss.

Procataline, a proprietary blend found in some Monat products, is said to function as an antioxidant, protecting your hair from environmental damage. Pea extract is included in this herbal blend.

A 2020 research study

With only ten volunteers, Trusted Source discovered that applying pea sprout extract to the scalp promoted hair growth. This study had no negative side effects, but more research is clearly needed.

According to the research, there is no reason to believe that Monat products cause hair loss. However, this does not mean that it has never occurred or that the products do not cause negative side effects in some people.

Are Monat products safe to use? 

Monat products are most likely safe for the vast majority of users. There may be horror stories and negative reviews online, but there are also many satisfied customers who return to the business time and time again.

The ideal Monat customer has no sensitivities or allergies to Monat ingredients. Of course, you could have a sensitivity and not realize it until you use Monat and have a negative reaction.

If you are allergic to botanical ingredients such as essential oils, or if you have a sensitive scalp, you should avoid Monat products. People with eczema, dandruff, scalp psoriasis, or other inflammatory scalp conditions should avoid it.

Because the evidence for Monat’s effectiveness is mostly provided by Monat, it’s difficult to say how well the products actually work.

If you have an underlying health condition that puts you at a higher risk of hair loss, or if your hair has been damaged by chemical treatments or bleaching, Monat cannot help you.

The products are designed to add volume and shine to thin hair. Monat is not intended to be a substitute for medical treatment of female pattern hair loss or alopecia areata.

The Houston influencer who was discovered dead on the side of the road worked for a contentious hair care MLM.

Alexis Sharkey, 26, was discovered dead on the side of the road in Houston on November 28. She had been building a business as a budding Instagram personality.

Sharkey’s mother, Stacey Robinault, told Insider in an interview that Sharkey had a talent for making people “feel good,” and that she was excellent at her job.

Sharkey, whose legal name is Alexis Robinault, worked as a “mentor” for Monat, a global company that markets its products through direct-to-consumer salespeople, also known as multi-level marketing (MLM). The Federal Trade Commission (FTC) has warned that “most people who join legitimate MLMs make little or no money.” MLM practices have been widely criticized for being predatory in their recruitment.

Monat, which is known for giving away luxurious vacations and prizes to its top sellers, has also been investigated by Florida’s attorney general after hundreds of customers claimed that its products caused hair loss and other symptoms. The investigation was concluded when the company agreed to a five-year communication plan with the office and was “permanently barred” from making “false or misleading statements in its marketing and sale of its beauty products.”

Sharkey found other Monat salespeople on Instagram, where she had approximately 20,000 followers at the time of her death. Sharkey now has 69,000 followers following the news of the 26-year-death, old’s the circumstances of which are still being investigated by Houston police.

In a statement, a Monat spokesperson told Insider, “Alexis Sharkey was a wonderful, warm, and well-liked independent MONAT market partner. We are deeply saddened by her untimely death, and our hearts go out to her family and friends who loved her.”

Monat has over 2 million customers and 400,000 independent contractors who “who sell the most safe and effective premium hair care, skin care and wellness products.” according to a spokesperson.

Alexis Sharkey ‘loved’ selling Monat products, according to her mother, who stated that Sharkey began working with Monat in the middle of 2018, based on her Instagram posts. Sharkey wrote in a June 2019 caption that her Monat business “has forever changed how I think and my life.”

Sharkey “thoroughly researched” Monat, according to Robinault, before deciding to sell the company’s products. Sharkey thought Monat’s products were “excellent” “And so she went through the process of educating herself on how to market and how to grow and how to build a business,” Robinault explained.

Robinault, on the other hand, was taken aback when her daughter began working for Monat in 2018. Sharkey disliked the fundraising activities required for sports teams in high school and forced her younger sister to sell products for her instead, Robinault recalled.

“The fact that my daughter’s livelihood is based on selling and marketing this product line just blows my mind because that is never, ever something I would’ve seen her do. And she did it so well, and she’s really into it “Insider spoke with Robinault.

Sharkey majored in biology in college and considered attending medical school. She moved from her small Pennsylvania town to the south after graduation, where she worked at a bar and “bounced around” in various cities before moving to Houston with her husband, Tom Sharkey, in January.

“She went down a totally different road, and she’s happy with it, and if she was happy with her life, I was happy for her,” Robinault said, adding that Sharkey was “very good” at selling Monat products and “and she loved it.”

“I think that she was building it enough that she was going to build herself this business to sustain her life,” she explained.

Robinault claims that her daughter was murdered. The circumstances surrounding Sharkey’s death are still unknown, as investigators await the results of a final autopsy. According to Houston police, she was discovered naked and with no visible injuries.

Monat operates as a cosmetics company that employs standard multi-level marketing techniques.

The Urdaneta family founded Monat in 2014, initially selling hair products and later expanding to include skincare products. “MONAT begins with a hair change and progresses to a life change. We provide a generous compensation package, an exceptionally nurturing support system, and caring, committed leaders who treat you as if you were family “According to the company’s website.

Monat’s business model is described as “direct sales/social marketing” on its website, and the company “bypasses traditional retail channels in favor of a person-to-person focus.”

MLM is used by some of the most well-known companies, including Arbonne and Mary Kay.

According to Sharkey’s Instagram profile, people who sell Monat products call themselves “mentors,” but the company appears to refer to them as “Market Partners” on its website. These salespeople recruit more salespeople, primarily through social media, and assist them in launching their own businesses by selling Monat products.

MLM companies, such as Monat, frequently reward top salespeople with luxury vacations and other glitzy gifts, such as cars. Many MLMs are chastised for selling salespeople on unrealistic success stories and rewards that are out of reach for the majority of salespeople. Sharkey shared photos from Monat’s “Passport” celebration in Cancun on Instagram in November 2019. “I must say, it’s nice working with a company that goes out of their way to make sure you feel loved and spoiled to death on the first night of your all paid vacation,” she wrote in the caption of the post.

Sharkey wrote in another post, “Off to company training,”

Though social media may provide a glamorous and vibrant view of MLM companies, many people who are drawn into MLM models have negative experiences.

Salespeople recruit not only new customers, but also new salespeople, in companies that employ MLM practices. Sharkey’s September 2019 Instagram post urged her followers to stop making “excuses” for not having time to sell Monat products as a side hustle and invited them to join a conference call to learn more.

These concerns are highlighted in a 2011 report by Jon M. Taylor, president of the Consumer Awareness Institute, an independent consumer advocacy and research organization.

“Built on an endless chain of recruitment,” Taylor writes in the report, “MLM is inherently flawed, deceptive, and profitable only for founders and those at or near the top of a pyramid of participants, usually those at the beginning of the chain of recruitment.” “MLM is also extremely viral and predatory.”

During the pandemic, many MLMs, including Monat, used these tactics to recruit newly unemployed Americans, according to Business Insider in April.

“The companies are so desperate to get people to join now, so they’ve really amped up their recruitment,” Emma Rose, a former network-sales distributor who now hosts “The Anti-MLM Podcast,” previously told Business Insider’s Paige Leskin in the spring. “They’re banking on the fact that people are scared and looking for help. They’re all selling assurances.”

According to Business Insider, MLM brands frequently position salespeople to appear financially successful with glamorous social-media posts, but the actual details of the money-making in selling the products are more complicated. According to Taylor’s Consumer Awareness Institute report, “MLM makes even gambling look like a safe bet in comparison,”

According to the FTC, some businesses that appear to be functional brands using MLMs are actually “pyramid schemes,” that make money by recruiting new salespeople rather than selling products.

Even in legitimate MLM businesses, however, the FTC warns that most salespeople “make little to no money,” some lose money, and some go into debt. According to a 2017 Quartz article, many people recruited into MLMs have psychological issues and are in debt.

Statistics

(reddit.com)

  • Well I had a short window to sell the product back at like 80% of what I paid for it
  • Meanwhile, 100% attendees are Chinese immigrants.
  • As far as I know, 99% of the people trying to promote WFG are Chinese and their clients are almost all Chinese.
  • Well I had a short window to sell the product back at like 80% of what I paid for it
  • Meanwhile, 100% attendees are Chinese immigrants.
  • As far as I know, 99% of the people trying to promote WFG are Chinese and their clients are almost all Chinese.

(insider.com)

  • Alexis Sharkey ‘loved’ selling Monat products, her mother said Sharkey began working with Monat in the middle of 2018, according to her Instagram posts.
  • The company also began to refund complainants, totaling roughly $82,000, according to the agreement.

(sun-sentinel.com)

  • Within three years, the company sold more than 20 million units of its product in the U.S. and Canada and generated about $300 million in 2017 alone for its corporate owner, Alcora Corp., according to the consolidated suit.
  • Misrepresenting that a product “does not and never will contain polyethylene glycol, petrochemicals, sulfates, harmful fragrances, and harmful colors,” and that its products are “100% vegan or gluten free.”
Why I stopped selling Monat