How to Get 8 Hours of Sleep in 4 Hours: Sleep is essential for good health. Not only it plays a big role in our physical and mental health, but also it signifies how productive we are in a day. We all know how important it is to be productive during our working hours. But with the rise of technology mainly cellphones and LEDs, the quantity and quality of our sleep have been severely compromised.

How to Get 8 Hours of Sleep in 4 Hours And Stay Productive

So far, a lot of you must have heard that getting an 8-hour sleep is required if you want to stay healthy. There is nothing “not true” about it, but the problem arises when people find it hard taking out 8 hours just for sleep!

Such people would go on trying different methods, or force themselves up out of the bed every day until they get too tired and get back to sleeping for long hours again. But do you think that’s the right thing to do? Don’t you think messing with your sleep cycle this often can harm you? So what can you do about it?

Just like every other transition, changing your sleep cycle also has a transition phase, and if you pass that phase, you end up continuing with your new sleeping cycle. But the question is, what really happens in that phase and how to pass it?

How can I sleep like 8 hours in 4 hours?

You can do it by sleeping for 4.5 hours instead of 4. Please note that you must cut down on your sleep only occasionally on the days where a dire need exists. If you make lesser sleep a habit, you will hurt your health and peace of mind in the long run.

That said, complete sleep is not about sleeping for 8 hours.

For example, you can wake up tired even after sleeping for about 8 hours or you can even wake up fresh by sleeping for only 3 hours or 4.5 hours.

Are you thinking “That’s impossible for me? I sleep over 7 hours but still feel sleepy in the morning.” You wake up tired because you did not Continue Reading You can do it by sleeping for 4.5 hours instead of 4. Please note that you must cut down on your sleep only occasionally on the days where a dire need exists. If you make lesser sleep a habit, you will hurt your health and peace of mind in the long run.

That said, complete sleep is not about sleeping for 8 hours.

For example, you can wake up tired even after sleeping for about 8 hours or you can even wake up fresh by sleeping for only 3 hours or 4.5 hours.

Are you thinking “That’s impossible for me? I sleep over 7 hours but still feel sleepy in the morning.” You wake up tired because you did not wake up at the right time. Waking up 20 minutes earlier could have changed this all. You can wake up fresh with lesser sleep by understanding the concept of sleep cycles.

The ideal time to wake up is based on the time you go to sleep. If you get into bed exactly the same time every night, the wake-up time is as easy as eating a cake. It will be at the same time every day.

Unfortunately, we have dishes to do, TV to watch, an unexpected phone call to answer, and so on, making it difficult to go to bed at the same time every day. In most cases for most people, going to bed at the same time is like the timing of a flight departure. There is a time of departure mentioned but we already know that it won’t be accurate. Similarly, since your sleeping time varies you have to calculate the ideal time to wake up on a daily basis by understanding sleep cycles.

Calculating your wake up time using Sleep Cycles:

Sleep consists of sleep cycles of 90 min or 1.5 hours each. Every night you go through multiple sleep cycles. The hack that you can use is, to ensure you wake up towards the end of the sleep cycle. If you wake up in the middle of a sleep cycle, the cycle is broken and you wake up exhausted. If you wake up towards the end of one cycle or early in the next cycle, you tend to remain fresh. Please note that the sleep cycle starts after you fall asleep(not when you get into bed). Therefore, you must also take into account the time you need to fall asleep. As per statistics, most people need 14 mins to fall asleep after they get into bed.

Let us take an example. If you get into bed at 10:45 PM and fall asleep at 11 PM, the ideal time for you to wake up is around the mark of 12:30 AM, 2 AM, 3:30 AM, 5 AM, 6:30 AM, and so on. If you didn’t notice, all these slots are multiple of 90 mins since you fell asleep. Waking up at 12:20 AM or 2:10 AM or 5:05 AM is fine and will still keep you fresh. Waking up at 1:30 AM or 5:30 AM is breaking your sleep cycle waking you up at a point that you hate getting out of bed. In simple words, aim to wake up within the last 10 or the first 10 minutes of a sleep cycle. Do not wake up in the 10–80 minute window of the sleep cycle.

In the long run, it is recommended to sleep for at least 6 hours on average. You can still wake up fresh with 3 or 4.5 hours of sleep daily, but it is not a good habit to follow in the long run. How many hours of sleep is good for you is subjective and varies from person to person. Some people manage with only 4.5 hours of sleep while some need 6 or 7.5 hours.

Since there is some math involved, you can avoid all those calculations by using this link when you hit the bed –

It’s the same as you work for 4 hours to complete the task of 8 hours (you do work with 2x efficiency). To reduce the time to sleep you have to increase the quality of sleep (you can say Deep Sleep). Here are some points to increase your quality of sleep-

Exercise – Yes, it’s the first and the most important point to increase the quality of sleep. You can’t ignore exercise.

Avoid Screen before sleeping – The very common thing that near about 94% of people do is they use their smartphones or laptops or other screens before bedtime & this habit disturbs your Melatonin Hormone schedule.

Exercise – Yes, it’s the first and the most important point to increase the quality of sleep. You can’t ignore exercise.

Avoid Screen before sleeping – The very common thing that near about 94% of people do is they use their smartphones or laptops or other screens before bedtime & this habit disturb your Melatonin Hormone schedule (it’s called the human clock), & our routine disturb.

Book reading – It’s the thing you can do in the place of using the screen late at night. It’s a good hobby and it relaxes your mind also & never distract your mind before sleeping (that is opposite to using mobile phones which allow your brain to distract easily).

These points will help you in sleeping at a particular time and with a relaxed brain which will help you to get up early and full of energy.

It’s a slow process so if you continue these things for at least 20 days you will definitely see quite a change in the quality of sleep & your personality too.

Answered February 18, 2017

There is a technique called a power nap. It is a short nap with is taken to increase your mental alertness and release stress. Getting 8 hours of sleep in 3 hours or less would not be beneficial as according to a new study sleeping more leads to a strong and more permanent memory than compared to sogging your night hours in front of the lamp.

However, during the day when you have even an hour of free time, you can take a short nap which would be beneficial and would act as a stress buster. To get the benefit of 8-hour sleep you should take a minimum of four to five hours of sleep at night and do insert a nap. Continue Reading There is a technique called a power nap. It is a short nap with is taken to increase your mental alertness and release stress. Getting 8 hours of sleep in 3 hours or less would not be beneficial as according to a new study sleeping more leads to a strong and more permanent memory than compared to sogging your night hours in front of the lamp.

However, during the day when you have even an hour of free time, you can take a short nap which would be beneficial and would act as a stress buster. To get the benefit of 8-hour sleep you should take a minimum of four to five hours to sleep at night and do insert a nap or two during the daytime.

Sleep energizes our brain and restores the neural connections and reduces the synaptic tension between the neurons. Thus it is absolutely necessary for our brain as the brain would not be able to make new connections and hence new memories without sleep.

Sleep is an indispensable part of our lives that is essential for our physical and emotional well-being. Getting an inadequate amount of sleep can make a person feel less productive and also damage our brain cells in the long run.

Coming back to the original question of how you can sleep 8 hours in 4 hours. A person can consider getting a biphasic or polyphasic sleep for him to be productive throughout the day. Biphasic sleep involves sleeping during two periods in 24 hours while polyphasic sleep involves sleeping 3 or 4 more times. It helps the person to get quality sleep and the person feels Continue Reading Sleep is an indispensable part of our lives that is essential for our physical and emotional well-being. Getting an inadequate amount of sleep can make a person feel less productive and also damage our brain cells in the long run.

Coming back to the original question of how you can sleep 8 hours in 4 hours. A person can consider getting a biphasic or polyphasic sleep for him to be productive throughout the day. Biphasic sleep involves sleeping during two periods in 24 hours while polyphasic sleep involves sleeping 3 or 4 more times. It helps the person to get quality sleep and the person feels more alert and focussed. While this kind of sleep isn’t advisable in the long run, it can help you perform better at work if your work requires you to put in some extra hours.

Getting at least 6-7 hours of sleep is essential for every person to be functional and maintain his immunity. A lack of sleep can make a person less immune to infections and diseases. Therefore, if it isn’t possible for you to get a 6-7 hour sleep in one go, you can consider getting a biphasic sleep. You should also make certain changes to your lifestyle such as avoiding caffeine before bed, exercising daily, and indulging in healthy eating to keep yourself in shape and stay productive throughout the day.

Learn how to trick your body into thinking you’ve slept eight hours after only sleeping four.

Sometimes we only have 4 hours to get in a good night’s sleep, whether you’re a college student cramming for a test, a working professional staying up late to finish a presentation, or you’re just an old fashioned night owl. Whatever the circumstance, you want to get a full night’s sleep in just a mere 4 hours. Learn how to do it in our detailed blog post.

Source: myslumberyard.com

Why Do Humans Sleep in 8-Hour Cycles?

Get your eight hours. A command so familiar it feels timeless: humans just need their eight hours of sleep. It’s natural. But our past sleep schedules challenge the idea that anything, even our biological needs, truly transcends historical boundaries.

For much of recorded history, humans have actually slept eight hours, but in two distinct phases of approximately four hours each. As scholar Roger Ekirch uncovered through his exhaustive historical study of literature, art, and diaries, people would once head to bed when it got dark, sleep for four hours, wake for a while, and slide into a “second sleep” for another four hours. People didn’t just toss and turn along in between their two sleep sessions: they would contemplate their dreams, read by candlelight, or have sex.

Writers from Livy to Plutarch to Virgil to Homer all referred to this structure, as well as medieval Christian and African tribal cultures. But the “biphasic sleep” pattern, which was governed by the natural timing of nightfall and sunrise, didn’t last in the modern era.

As artificially illuminating the night sky became more affordable, life and soon sleep habits changed. Fifty European cities introduced tax-supported street lighting by 1700 and made it safe and socially acceptable to move about publicly after dark, a time of day that had previously been considered the domain solely of prostitutes and other suspicious characters. The assumption that nothing good could go on at night was so widespread that until the arrival of artificial lighting, citizens often freely emptied their “piss-pots” out of windows after dark.

In the United States, Baltimore became the first city to be lit by gas in 1816; a century later, electricity in streets and in growing numbers of homes meant nightfall no longer ensured the inescapable darkness that had dictated beginning one’s first sleep soon after. Going out at night became a fashionable social pastime, pushing bedtime later and bringing the two separate sleep phases closer to the single stretch we know today.

‘Girl with a Candle’, late 17th-century painting in the collection of the State A Pushkin Museum of Fine Arts, Moscow. (Credit: Fine Art Images/Heritage Images/Getty Images) It was industrialization that solidified single sleep as a social norm. Especially in the cities that increasingly revolved around factory production, a newly formalized workday structured daily life and a fascination with productivity meant that spending hours lolling around in the middle of the night was considered slothful.

School schedules also became increasingly standardized, and as early as the 1820s, parenting books advised promptly weaning children from the two-sleep pattern. By the late 19th century in the United States, school attendance was compulsory, creating yet another cultural pressure to conform to this new sleeping schedule.

Clocks had existed since the ancient world, but when Levi Hutchins of New Hampshire in 1787 fashioned the first mechanical alarm clock specifically to rouse him for work, it marked a new understanding of the relationship between sleep and labor. Half a century later, Frenchman Antonie Redier patented the invention; in 1876, Seth E. Thomas mass-produced a wildly popular American version embraced by a society required to adjust its biological rhythms to the industrial clock. By World War II, the U.S. Office of Price Administration reluctantly lifted a production ban on “emergency” alarm clocks since workers with broken devices were sleeping through factory shifts crucial to the war effort.

Perhaps the most compelling evidence of the general acceptance of this new norm is the anxiety among and about those who failed to abide by it. In medieval Europe, for example, historian Eluned Summers-Bremner found that nocturnal wakefulness was encouraged as a form of vigilance against bedbugs, arsonists, or the Devil, who was believed to prey on the oblivious slumberer. But by the late 19th century, insomnia defined as the inability to sleep restfully through a single sleep cycle had been categorized as a disorder, signaling the end of the era of the unproblematic segmented sleep.

These days, advice literature continues to idealize the elusive, uninterrupted 8-hour slumber ironically eroded by our 24/7 connectedness. Yet if there is a “natural” sleep cycle to aspire to, science suggests it is closer to the biphasic model than to our dearly held 8-hour idyll. When locked in total darkness for 14 hours a day, people settled into a very particular sleep pattern: two 4-hour sessions.

FACT CHECK:

We strive for accuracy and fairness. But if you see something that doesn’t look right, click here to contact us! HISTORY reviews and updates its content regularly to ensure it is complete and accurate.

Source: history.com

Sleeping hours: what is the ideal number and how does age impact this?

1Healthy Active Living and Obesity Research Group, Children’s Hospital of Eastern Ontario Research Institute, Ottawa, ON, Canada, ac.no.oehc@tupahcpj 2Department of Pediatrics, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, ON, Canada, ac.no.oehc@tupahcpj 3School of Human Kinetics, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, ON, Canada, ac.no.oehc@tupahcpj 4School of Epidemiology and Public Health, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, ON, Canada, ac.no.oehc@tupahcpj Find articles by

Source: ncbi.nlm.nih.gov

Twain Harte Pharmacy

What Is Segmented Sleep and Is It Healthy?

By Alicia Barney, Most of us sleep the same way. Collapse into bed in the late evening, then spend the next 8 hours — if we’re lucky — dreaming and snoring until the alarm rings. But that’s not how everyone does it. Some folks break up their slumber into two or more shifts. It’s called segmented sleep, and there’s a lot of buzz that it’s the way to go in today’s fast-paced world.

But before you dive in and make plans for some middle-of-the-night chores, think carefully about whether it’s really suited to your lifestyle. And watch out for warning signs that this alternate sleep schedule is putting you in a funk.

Source: webmd.com

How Much Sleep Do We Really Need to Work Productively?

Every one of us, on average, will be sleeping 24 years in our lifetime. That’s a pretty long time if you ask me and makes it even more important to know exactly how the phenomenon of sleep impacts us.

And still, there are so many unanswered questions revolving around sleep and how much we need of it. In fact, most of what we know about sleep we’ve learned in the past 25 years.

One of the biggest problems I’ve discovered is that sleep is such an over the talked topic. We get the general idea that we know all about it: how much we need of it, how it impacts us, and why this or that happens when we sleep. Once I took a step back to really think about where our knowledge about sleep comes from, I realized that nearly all of it is based on hear-say or what my mom told me when I was in elementary school.

With this post, I’ve set out to uncover once and for all what the most important research has taught us about sleep. And of course, how you can use this knowledge to create an unbeatable daily routine.

Share stories like this to your social media followers when they’re most likely to click, favorite, and reply! Schedule your first post with Buffer.

Source: buffer.com

Why Sleep Is Essential

Before you try and cheat the system, let’s fill you in on why the system is in place in the first place. Everyone has two stages of sleep; REM (rapid eye movement) sleep and non-REM sleep, and each serves an essential bodily function.

Non REM sleep has three different stages which play a role in repairing the body’s muscle tissues, retaining and building muscle (which is helpful for older folks), and strengthening the immune system.

REM sleep, on the other hand, refreshes your mind and is crucial for important brain functions like memory retention, learning, regulating your mood, and brain development for younger individuals. Accordingly, a lack of sleep can mean you’re missing out on fundamental bodily processes meant to support your general health. So if you’re going to only get 4 hours of sleep in one night, make sure you don’t make it a habit.

Source: myslumberyard.com

The trap of too little sleep: What happens to our brains if we don’t have enough sleep?

Now, this part is one of the most fascinating aspects of sleep I believe. Did it ever happen to you that someone who got only 4 hours of sleep a night looks just as attentive, fresh, and up to his game as you, who spent your 7.5 hours in bed?

Well, the answer is – that someone who is severely sleep deprived is in fact as attentive and awake as you are. With one big difference to you. Here is what a recent study found:

The sleep-deprived person can in fact deliver the exact same results as someone who isn’t sleep deprived in any exercise. That is, given it is a non-repeated exercise and they give it their best shot.

Odd right? Now onto this though:

The problem lies elsewhere. Whether we are sleep deprived or not, we lose focus at times. And that is precisely where the sleep-deprived person lands in a trap. Once we start to lose focus and have received the right amount of sleep, our brain can compensate for that and increase attention (see the image below for the increased yellow bits that shift your focus back.). If we are sleep deprived, our brain can’t refocus.

says Clifford Saper from Harvard. In the following image, you can see what this means. As you lose focus and your attention is drifting, the yellow bits show how people with enough sleep, activate parts in their brain to refocus at the task at hand. Sleep-deprived people will have barely any activity in that area (the amygdala reactivity) and will struggle to regain focus:

So really, this can turn into a huge trap. The person bragging that they only slept 4 hours and still do great work, well, they are actually right with what they are saying. The only issue is that they have no brainpower to steer them back to focus once they lose attention.

Even worse so, sleep-deprived people don’t notice their decrease in performance.

Source: buffer.com

How Much Sleep Does Your Child Need?

Chronic sleep problems in children and teens can seriously compromise school performance. Sleepy youngsters are more accident-prone, too. But young people rarely recognize that they need more sleep. Many kids eagerly stay up late no matter how early their morning wake-up alarm is set.

Do you know how much sleep your child needs? The number of hours in a 24-hour period varies based on a child’s age. Review the chart below to see how much sleep your child needs and to learn more about his or her sleep patterns.

Age

Average sleep per 24 hrs

Sleep patterns

Newborns 16 to 20 hours

1-to 4-hour sleep periods followed by 1- to 2-hour awake periods

Newborns needs as much sleep during the day as they do at night

Infant (up to 1 year) Total of 14 to 15 hours at 4 months, and 13 to 14 hours at 6 months

3- to 4-hour sleep periods the first three months, 6- to 8-hour sleep periods between 4 and 6 months

Day/night differentiation develops between 6 weeks and 3 months

At 9 months, about three-quarters will “settle” and sleep through the night

2 to 4 hours of naptime, divided between 2 naps a day

Toddlers (1 to 3 years) 12 hours, total Night sleep plus 1 nap of 1.5 to 3.5 hours

Preschool (3 to 6 years) 11 to 12 hours Napping declines, usually ending around 5 years of age

Middle Childhood 6 to 12 years) 10 to 11 hours

Low levels of daytime sleepiness

Increased discrepancy between school night and non-school night sleep amounts

Adolescence (12 years and older) 9 hours are ideal, but 7 hours more typical

sleep schedule often becomes irregular

Puberty changes the circadian phases (sleeping-and-waking cycles), making bedtimes later and rise times earlier

Source: texaschildrens.org

How Much Sleep Do Babies Need?

Babies spend the majority of their day sleeping. The normal amount of time that babies sleep depends on their age.

Source: sleepfoundation.org

Why Do Babies Sleep So Much?

Babies spend more than half of their time sleeping because this is a period of substantial growth. Sleep allows the brain to develop, building networks, and engaging in activity that facilitates thinking and learning as well as the formation of behavior. Sleep and nutrition also allow a baby to develop physically, growing bigger, and acquiring better motor skills.

Source: sleepfoundation.org

Short Sleep Duration by Sex, Age, and Race/Ethnicity

In 2014, short sleep duration (less than 7 hours) was less common among respondents aged ≥65 years (26.3%) compared with other age groups (see Table 1). The age-adjusted prevalence of short sleep duration was higher among Native Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders (46.3%), non-Hispanic blacks (45.8%), multiracial non-Hispanics (44.3%), and American Indians/Alaska Natives (40.4%) compared with non-Hispanic whites (33.4%), Hispanics (34.5%), and Asians (37.5%). Short sleep prevalence did not differ between men and women.

Source: cdc.gov

Continuing on with the idea of light influencing your circadian rhythm, you want to make sure your bedroom is nice and dark when you go to bed. (myslumberyard.com)

However, as discussed in this article and by other sleep experts, 76 there is no magic number for optimal sleep, and sleep is influenced by inter- and intra-individual factors. (ncbi.nlm.nih.gov)

Eliminating the 8 hours per night sleep myth Everyone I’ve asked the question “how much sleep do I need” has an answer to the question. (buffer.com)

Lack of sufficient sleep at a young age has been correlated with problems with weight, mental health, behavior, and cognitive performance. (sleepfoundation.org)

How to Get 8 Hours of Sleep in 4 Hours