Average Height and Weight for a Great Pyrenees

The average height for this breed of dog is between 24-28 inches (60-70 cm) when they are fully matured. However, you may find some Great Pyrenees that are slightly larger or slightly smaller even though they have been created to be about the same size.

Their weight is also dependent on the variations in height. However, most adults will weigh between 70 to 120 pounds (33 – 55 kg). They are not too heavy, but the Great Pyrenees certainly look like they would be as big as a small lion when they are fully grown.

These dogs have been created to be larger than most other breeds of dog and they are generally between 17 and 22 inches (40-56 cm) high at their shoulders. However, you can find some Great Pyrenees who are taller or shorter even though this breed is generally expected to meet these minimum requirements for height.

They all have a thick neck and a muscular body with long legs.

How Many Types of Great Pyrenees Are There?

Before the breed standard was set, there were two types of Great Pyrenees: Eastern and Western. They had different shapes and snouts. Now, aside from slight color variations, there is only one sort of Great Pyrenees.

How Much Do Great Pyrenees Shed?

It is not uncommon for Great Pyrenees to shed moderately or heavily — regular brushing can alleviate this issue.

Do You Need to Groom a Great Pyrenees?

Great Pyrenees are large, fluffy, and require regular grooming.

Are Great Pyrenees puppies aggressive

The Great Pyrenees has the potential to become aggressive if it isn’t properly trained and socialized.

Dogs usually react to strangers by barking and growling. If a stranger invades your home, the dog will most likely fight to protect it. … Great Pyrenees are typically laid-back and reserved. Some individuals, however, may be more aggressive than others.

Great Pyrenees Puppies: Guide

Size
Giant. Great Pyrenees males will reach a height of 27-32  inches, while females will usually be 25-29 inches tall. Typically, males weigh 100+ pounds, and females weigh 85+ pounds.
Breed Characteristics
Great Pyrenees are strong, muscular dogs. They sport a regal, weatherproof double coat that comes in a striking shade of white.His dark brown eyes express patient kindness, and he has a curved “shepherd’s hook” tail.
Temperament
Placid and calm, the Great Pyrenees is a gentle and affectionate breed great for families. They’re patient and tolerant with kids, although they can sometimes be overly protective around strangers and unfamiliar pets.This combined with their size can make them very intimidating, so training and socialization are needed to help control their protective instincts.

This breed is on the serious side. They’re also confident and fearless.

Grooming and Health Needs
Great Pyrenees shed. A lot. While their outer coat is dirt and tangle-resistant, their soft undercoat will shed significantly.Weekly 30-minute brushing sessions will reduce the amount of fur that ends up on your furniture and clothes.

This is not a dog for those that need spotless carpets or mind tiny dog hair tumbleweeds blowing around the floorboards. (Though an aggressive cleaning schedule or robot vacuum can help.)

Potential health problems include hip dysplasia, cancer, bloat, eye problems, and heart problems.

Training
The Great Pyrenees is an independent thinker with a strong will. This can lead to training difficulties, especially for puppies.His job as an unsupervised guard dog meant long hours spent alone. This can sometimes translate into a breed that is not accustomed to taking orders, and a little fuzzball that suddenly pretends they don’t remember their name or how to “drop it”.

Owners must be patient and firm to make training stick. Vetstreet recommends positive training to encourage good behavior, as they are smart enough to stymie their own training. (Following commands as slowly as possible is a known trait.)

Consider short and fun training sessions, and use whatever tools you need to, as Great Pyrenes can become bored easily, and engagement is key. As long as they’re interacting with you and receiving a response, they should continue paying attention.

Socialization is also important, as, without it, Great Pyrenees puppies can become overly protective of their family. (Even if there’s only one of you.)

It’s necessary to help them meet different kinds of people in controlled environments, so they can identify and learn what’s merely a chaotic situation, and what’s truly dangerous.

Energy Level
Great Pyrenees have a moderate energy level. They’re generally satisfied with just a couple of short daily walks. They also benefit from canine activities such as obedience trials and nosework.Despite their label as a herder, Great Pyrenees were meant as guards. While they can spring into action, they were bred to stay still and vigilant for long hours and naturally conserve their energy.
Life Expectancy
On average, 10-12 years.

 

What Diseases are Great Pyrenees Prone To?

Hip and/or Elbow Dysplasia: Hip and elbow dysplasia are two of the most common skeletal diseases seen in dogs. They are similar diseases in which either the hip or elbow joint has grown abnormally or is misshapen. The abnormal shape prevents the joints and sockets from adequately meeting one another, resulting in rubbing and grinding instead of sliding smoothly. Though the main complication with hip dysplasia is joint instability, the abnormalities present in elbow dysplasia often result in pieces of bone and/or cartilage breaking loose and irritating the joint tissues. Over time, the rubbing from dysplasia can cause a variety of issues such as pain, lameness, and secondary osteoarthritis. Surgery can be done to fix the joint if diagnosed before the onset of arthritis. If you are rescuing a Great Pyrenees , have him checked out by a vet to see if he has or is prone to getting dysplasia, so you know what he will be able to handle regarding activities and exercise.

Eye Issues: Cataracts, a common eye condition that causes cloudiness in the eye and obstructs vision; and progressive retinal atrophy (PRA), a progressive degenerative disease affecting the retina that eventually leads to blindness.

Others: Bone cancer and gastric torsion, a painful and potentially fatal bloating of the stomach that affects deeper-chested breeds. When given the proper diet and exercise, many of these issues can be kept at bay.

Source: adoptapet.com

The Typical Great Pyrenees Temperament

The Great Pyrenees temperament is one of the most important factors for those considering adding the breed to their family. The breed was created to guard livestock, but are now most often found as a people-friendly companion animal.

What is it like living with a Great Pyrenees? They are affectionate and loyal animals, but they are also watchful and territorial. As with any dog, it is important to raise them responsibly and give them plenty of early socialization so that they can be comfortable in all types of situations.

Also, because the breed is known to be protective of its flock or family, early training and socialization is important so that you are well prepared if your dog feels the need to act on his guard instincts.

One of the most often asked questions about Great Pyrenees dogs is what kind of personalities they have. Listed below are some traits of the breed that people can expect when considering this type of pet:

Although they are one of the oldest herding dogs, they are not nanny-dogs. Some owners joke about their dog trying to herd them around.

They are often referred as the “King of the Mountain”. They have a strong bond with their families and herds.

They are not known to be solicitous of small children. Great Pyrenees usually have a calm temperament, but they can be cranky when they want to be. They are also extremely protective of their families and territory, so young children should not be left alone in the same room with them.

Although they do bark a lot, most Great Pyrenees bark only when there is something to guard rather than just for noise or the sake of it. However, with proper training, it’s possible for them to live with other dogs and cats in harmony.

Are Great Pyrenees Easy to Train?

The Great Pyrenees breed is known for having a sweet disposition, but they are not the easiest dogs to train because of their independent minds. This guide will help you understand what makes them so difficult to train and how you can modify your strategy to successfully live with a Great Pyrenees at home.

If you have had experience training other breeds before, there are some differences in training a Great Pyrenees that may surprise you! For one, they take much longer than many other breeds to learn anything. They also don’t respond well when told “no” and may just look at you as if they have no idea what is going on. These are general principles you should know about before getting started.

The most important thing to know is that Great Pyrenees are not the easiest dogs to train. This breed is also known as a working dog – they were meant to assist humans with herding and guarding work, so the independent nature of the breed can be hard to handle for less experienced dog trainers.

Factors of Training Difficulty

Even if you have had experience training other breeds before, there are some differences in training a Great Pyrenees that may surprise you! For one, they take much longer than many other breeds to learn anything. They also don’t respond well when told “no” and may just look at you as if they have no idea what is going on. These are general principles you should know about before getting started.

Independent Nature . Great Pyrenees are not the easiest breed to train because of their independent minds. They don’t require a lot of training time per se – they just need it to be consistent so that they can learn and develop a foundation for their expectations. This means that dogs that were trained in traditional methods like leash walking or housebreaking may have had a harder time with this breed than other dogs trained in newer methods.

This means that dogs that were trained in traditional methods like leash walking or housebreaking may have had a harder time with this breed than other dogs trained in newer methods. Communication. Great Pyrenees need to know what is expected of them so they can be confident in what they are doing. Their independent nature makes it much harder for them to understand what you want from them than other dogs.

Great Pyrenees Puppies in NC – Breeders

Cotton Bean Farms

Adopt a Pet

Montgomery Sheep Farm

Rehoboth Farms

 

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Great Pyrenees Puppies in NC