How to make Slime Activator with Salt

How to make Slime Activator with Salt

How to make Slime Activator with Salt – This is our number one favorite on the slime activator list because it makes an awesome stretchy slime. It’s also more easily available for UK, Australian and Canadian residents.

How to make Slime Activator with Salt : SALINE SOLUTION 

This slime activator is also commonly used as a contact solution, but I highly recommend picking up the lesser expensive saline solution instead.

Also, on our slime activators list is salt. So how to make slime activator with salt. You have to make a saline solution first by mixing salt with water. To make this saline solution use one cup of water and half a teaspoon of salt and place this in a pan. Boil this for approximately fifteen minutes and keep the pan lid on to avoid evaporation. You will then need to allow the pan to cool until it is at room temperature. Finally, carefully pour this solution into a bottle and jar which has a lid. You are now ready to start combining it with the glue to make some gooey fun stuff!

How to make Slime Activator with Salt – Salt is a good option as an activator for slime as it is readily available and it is also cheap to purchase. The volume of salt that you can purchase can produce a large quantity of slime which is useful if you need to make a large amount or if you plan to make it on a few occasions.

HOW TO MAKE SALINE SOLUTION SLIME RECIPE

YOU WILL NEED:

  • 1/2 cup Clear or White PVA School Glue
  • 1 tablespoon Saline Solution (must contain boric acid and sodium borate)
  • 1/2 cup of Water
  • 1/4-1/2 tsp Baking Soda
  • Food coloring, confetti, glitter, and other fun mix-ins (CHANGE FOR RECIPE)

How to make Slime Activator with Salt

 

STEP 1:  In a bowl mix 1/2 cup water and 1/2 cup of glue well to combine completely.

How to make Slime Activator with Salt

STEP 2: Now’s the time to add (color, glitter, or confetti)! Remember when you add color to white glue, the color will be lighter. Use clear glue for jewel toned colors!

BAKING SODA SLIME

STEP 3: Stir in 1/4- 1/2 tsp baking soda.

Baking soda helps to firm and form the slime. You can play around with how much you add but we prefer between 1/4 and 1/2 tsp per batch. I get asked all the time why do you need baking soda for slime. Baking soda helps to improve the firmness of the slime. You can experiment with your own ratios!

This slime recipe is also called BAKING SODA SLIME!

STEP 4: Mix in 1 tbsp saline solution and stir until slime forms and pulls away from sides of the bowl.   This is exactly how much you will need with the Target Sensitive Eyes brand, but other brands may differ slightly!

If your slime still feels too sticky, you may need a few more drops of saline solution. As I mentioned above, start by squirting a few drops of the solution onto your hands and kneading your slime longer. You can always add but you can’t take away.  Saline solution is preferred over contact solution.

STEP 5:  Start kneading your slime! It will appear stringy at first but just work it around with your hands and you will notice the consistency changes. You can also put it in a clean container and set it aside for 3 minutes, and you will also notice the change in consistency!

 

SLIME TIP:   We always recommend kneading your slime well after mixing. Kneading the slime really helps to improve its consistency. The trick with this slime is to put a few drops of the saline soluti9n onto your hands before picking up the slime.

You can knead the slime in the bowl before you pick it up as well. This slime is stretchy but can be stickier. However, keep in mind that although adding more activator (saline solution) reduces the stickiness, and it will eventually create a stiffer slime.

BAKING SODA SLIME

You will love how easy and stretchy this saline slime is to make, and play with too!  Once you have your desired slime consistency, time to have fun!  How big of a stretch can you get without the slime breaking?

SLIME TIPS AND TRICKS on How to make Slime Activator with Salt

  • Baking soda helps to firm and form the slime.  You can experiment with your own ratios!
  • BAKING SODA SLIME TIP: Clear glue slime usually doesn’t need quite as much baking soda as white glue slime!
  • The saline solution is the slime activator and helps the slime to get its rubbery texture! Be careful, adding too much saline solution can make for a slime that’s too stiff and not stretchy!
  • Give this slime a fast stir to activate the mixture. You will notice the thickness change as you stir it.  You will also notice the volume of your mixture changes as you whip it up.
  • Slime is awesome for tactile sensory play, but make sure to wash hands and surfaces after making and playing with slime.
  • Make a few batches in different colors and swirl them together as shown in the cover photo or below! Think of what other color combinations your kids would enjoy. Slime making is only limited by the imagination of the hands creating it!

More info at : Little Bins Little Hands

Chicken Soup from Bones in Slow Cooker

Chicken Soup from Bones in Slow Cooker

This Chicken Soup from Bones in Slow Cooker recipe is easy as can be. Just toss a chicken carcass in a pot with some aromatics, add water, soy sauce, and apple cider, and forget about it for a while.

Serves 10
Serving Size: 1 portion
Calories Per Serving: 153
% Daily Value
7% Total Fat 4.8g
Saturated Fat 1.3g
Trans Fat 0g
9% Cholesterol 28.2mg
30% Sodium 728.7mg
4% Total Carbohydrate 12.7g
3% Dietary Fiber 0.8g
Sugars 6g
28% Protein 13.9g

Chicken Soup from Bones in Slow Cooker

Chicken Soup from Bones in Slow Cooker Variations

Main recipe lower on page starting with RED heading

Slow Cooker Leftover Roast Chicken Soup

Chicken Soup from Bones in Slow Cooker – Toss your roast chicken carcass and desired aromatics (that means vegetables or herbs) in your slow cooker and cook on slow for 8 hours or overnight. (Trust us, the only thing better than the smell of coffee in the morning is the aroma of chicken soup.) Continue with step 3 in the instructions above. Easy just got even easier.

Leftover Roast Chicken Soup with Carbs

Chicken Soup from Bones in Slow Cooker – If you like rice or pasta, cook some up in a separate pot, stealing some of the broth from the soup pot to use as your cooking liquid.

Egg Drop Soup With Leftover Roast Chicken

Lightly whisk 3 eggs to combine. Stir the finished soup in a clockwise direction and, while still stirring, pour in the eggs in a slow, steady stream. Continue to stir for 1 to 2 minutes, until egg ribbons form. Ladle into bowls and garnish with thinly sliced scallions if you’ve got ’em.

Slow Cooked Roast Chicken Jamie Oliver

How to make Gravy with Flour and Water and Grease

How to Make Brown Gravy Mix Taste Better

How to make gravy with flour and water

Chicken soup revisited: calcium content of soup increases with duration of cooking

Ingredients for Chicken Soup from Bones in Slow Cooker

  • Roast chicken carcass with some meat attached (on the wings, back, etc.)
  • Any aromatics you desire (you know, the usual stuff including garlic, herbs, onion, carrots, ginger, etc.)
  • 1/4 to 1/2 cup soy sauce (Christina Tosi likes Kikkoman)
  • 1/3 to 2/3 cup apple cider or apple juice
  • 1/4 to 1/2 teaspoon black pepper

Directions for Chicken Soup from Bones in Slow Cooker

  • 1. To make the Leftover Roast Chicken Soup in your slow cooker, see the Slow Cooker Variation above. To make the Leftover Roast Chicken Soup on your stove top, combine the chicken carcass and any residual meat and desired aromatics in a large stock pot (5- to 8-quart capacity) and fill the pot with water so the chicken is fully submerged. Set over the lowest of low heat, lid that puppy 3/4 of the way so the water can evaporate a little bit but not too much, and leave it for at least 6 hours, skimming any scum that accumulates on the surface of the stock but leaving any puddles of fat. [Editor’s Note: Christina Tosi leaves the stock simmering overnight. You may or may not wish to do the same. We guess it depends on your level of risk taking and whether your homeowner’s insurance is up to date.]
  • 2. Remove the pot from the heat. Your kitchen smells amazing, right? Strain the liquid from the chicken into another large pot and let the solids rest in the strainer. Walk away for a little while. Brush your teeth. Brush your hair. The chicken should be cool enough to handle at this point.
  • 3. Using your hands, separate the chicken meat from the bones, aromatics, and gelatin. Don’t be grossed out—put your best farm girl face on, roll up your sleeves, and get to work. This should yield 2 to 3 cups light and dark meat, depending on how much chicken you ate the night before. Toss the bones and stuff in the trash. Add the shredded chicken to the pot with the broth. (You can cover and refrigerate the soup until dinnertime.)
  • 4. Bring the soup to a gentle simmer. If you want, you can clean out your fridge by throwing in a handful of baby carrots, chopped onion, Brussels sprouts, spinach, or whatever else you’ve got languishing in your vegetable bin. It’ll taste awesome. Simmer until the soup is warmed through and any vegetables are tender.
  • 5. Stir in the soy sauce, apple cider, and black pepper to taste and ladle into bowls.