Cucumber Raita Jamie Oliver

Cucumber Raita Jamie Oliver

Cucumber Raita Jamie Oliver: It’s not easy to find a dish that can feed you for an entire day when you’re on the go. But with Jamie Oliver’s cucumber raita, a store cupboard staple, you can whip up a colourful and protein-packed meal in minutes. The recipe is ridiculously easy: just mix together some raita, two eggs, and half an avocado for dinner or lunch with some crackers for snacks. It might sound simple but it really is so impressive to eat!

Cucumber Raita Jamie Oliver

If you need quick time-saving recipes then this is the post for you! You’ll find out how to make Jamie Oliver’s cucumber raita in no time at all.

Cook With Jamie Oliver – Cucumber Raita

Ingredients

Serves 4

2 cups (400g) Greek yogurt or 3 heaped tablespoons dahi (indian style yoghurt)
1 cucumber, finely chopped into small pieces – save the leaves for garnish if any are left over! ~OR~ you could even leave off the cucumber and serve as a raita with a side of roasted cashews for an alternative flavour!
6 cherry tomatoes, seeded and chopped into cubes ~OR~ 1/2 cup chopped red pepper 1/4 cup coriander leaves, finely chopped 1 heaped teaspoon cumin seeds, toasted in a dry pan until fragrant and then ground in.
3 eggs, fried sunny side up and served on top of the raita
2 teaspoons of lemon juice
1 teaspoon chaat masala (or regular paprika will do)
chapatti or warm pitta bread to serve (optional)

Cucumber Raita Jamie Oliver

Method

Mix together the yogurt, cucumber, tomatoes, coriander leaves and cumin in a bowl. Crack your eggs into a pan over a low heat. Cook softly for 3-4 minutes until set. You can either leave them as they are on top of the raita if that looks pretty enough, or take some care to slide around the whites so they’re still whole on top of the mix.
Add the lemon juice and chaat masala to the raita. Add more salt if needed.
Serve with 3 fried eggs on top, garnished with extra coriander leaves. Flatbreads are optional but worth a try!
Recipe adapted from How To Cook Like Heston
Source: http://www.jamieoliver.com/recipes/cucumber-raita/

Cucumber yoghurt with poached egg

Cucumber yoghurt with poached egg

Ingredients

Serves 4
2 cups (400g) Greek yogurt or 3 heaped tablespoons dahi (indian style yoghurt) 1 cucumber, finely chopped into small pieces – save the leaves for garnish if any are left over! ~OR~ you could even leave off the cucumber and serve as a raita with a side of roasted cashews for an alternative flavour! 6 cherry tomatoes, seeded and chopped into cubes ~OR~ 1/2 cup chopped red pepper 1/4 cup coriander leaves, finely chopped 1 heaped teaspoon cumin seeds, toasted in a dry pan until fragrant and then ground in. 3 eggs, fried sunny side up and served on top of the raita 2 teaspoons of lemon juice 1 teaspoon chaat masala (or regular paprika will do) chapatti or warm pitta bread to serve (optional)

Cucumber yoghurt with poached egg

Method

Mix together the yogurt, cucumber, tomatoes, coriander leaves and cumin in a bowl. Crack your eggs into a pan over a low heat. Cook softly for 3-4 minutes until set. You can either leave them as they are on top of the raita if that looks pretty enough, or take some care to slide around the whites so they’re still whole on top of the mix. Add the lemon juice and chaat masala to the raita. Add more salt if needed. Serve with 3 fried eggs on top, garnished with extra coriander leaves. Flatbreads are optional but worth a try!
Recipe adapted from How To Cook Like Heston Source: http://www.jamieoliver.com/recipes/cucumber-raita/

What is the difference between Tzatziki and cucumber raita?

Tzatziki is a sour cream and garlic based dip made with strained yogurt, while cucumber raita is made out of cucumber and yogurt. In addition to garlic, tzatziki can also have dry mint leaves, fresh dill, or parsley added. The cool and refreshing cucumber raita goes perfectly with spicy curries. Tzatziki has a salty zesty flavor that goes nicely with meats like fried halloumi cheese or lamb meatballs whereas the cuke raita’s texture is smoother than that of tzatziki.

Tzatziki

Both are popular as an accompaniment to Indian food although they typically differ in their thickness and in the regional cuisine each belongs to. The cucumber variety is thicker and softer with a slightly sour taste whereas the tzatziki is thinner and more tangy.

The origin of this tandoori seasoned cucumber raita is Indian. It was introduced by the Muslims to India after they invaded in the 11th century, as a means of increasing the consumption of yogurt. Yogurt was always consumed among Muslim communities because it was a healthy substitute for milk products and it also had other medicinal benefits like easing digestion and boosting immunity. The basic ingredients are yogurt, cucumber, garlic, lemon juice and salt.

Is cucumber raita good for health?

Since this dish contains yogurt, it may not be good for those who have lactose intolerance. There are alternative ingredients like greek yoghurt that you can substitute with instead.
In terms of health benefits, the cucumbers provide vitamin A and K while the yogurt provides protein and calcium. The spices in this dish contain beneficial properties like turmeric which is a natural pain reliever which promotes bone health among other things.
Due to the spices and yogurt in this dish, it may not be good for individuals who suffer from ulcers. If you are unsure, it is advisable to consult a physician before you consume this dish.

How long does raita last in the fridge?

Raita is generally best consumed within a day or two or three. The sauce is made from yogurt, garlic, spices and vinegar. It’s important to keep in mind that the longer it sits in the fridge, the more watery it becomes.

Fig Jam Jamie Oliver

Pommes Anna Jamie Oliver

Substitute/Alternative Ingredients

  • fresh mint
  • mint yogurt sauce
  • mint leaves
  • Mint Heat
  • mint & avocado
  • mint yoghurt dressing
  • mint yoghurt dip
  • tablespoon curry paste
  • mild curry powder
  • tablespoon curry powder
  • Indian chicken curry
  • meatball curry
  • Tandoori Curry Paste Olive Oil Preheat
  • black pepper
  • pepper flakes
  • cayenne pepper
  • pinch of pepper
  • chile pepper
  • Pepper Preheat
  • tablespoon vegetable oil
  • crunchy vegetables
  • vegetable oil 1 organic low-salt vegetable stock cube
  • korean vegetables
  • Vegetable recipes
  • raw vegetables
  • lemon juice
  • squeeze of juice
  • drops of juice
  • tangerine juice
  • fresh coriander
  • coriander leaves
  • ground coriander
  • Handful coriander

Statistics

  • 36 % Total Carbohydrate 12.5g 4 % (bigoven.com)
  • Dietary Fiber 3.3g 13 % Sugars, other 9.2g (bigoven.com)
  • Some time last year, I read an article about vitamin study by University of Eastern Finland and University of Minnesota researchers, where it was found that women who took vitamins might slightly increase their risk of death by 2.4 percent. (axokuaci.wordpress.com)
  • The company, according to some accounts , owed creditors nearly €91 million. (irishtimes.com)
  • “Probably I was too trusting, which is one of my problems and also one of my benefits,” said Oliver, who estimated that he mishandles about 40 per cent of his business ventures. (irishtimes.com)
  • He has sold more than 45 million of them – €6.7 million worth just last year, according to Nielsen Book Research – and is the country’s best-selling nonfiction author. (irishtimes.com)